Data bank

Data from India and Indian states.

Basic Amenities

Economic Impact of Inadequate Sanitation in India

1. The Indian economy loses nearly $54 billion (around Rs 24,000 crore) annually due to lack of toilets and poor hygiene equivalent to 6.4 percent of India’s GDP in 2006.

2. The cost of treatment for diseases due to poor hygiene was estimated at $38.5 billion (over Rs 17,000 crore).

3. The Planning Commission had earlier estimated that although 49% of the country's urban population has access to sanitary excreta disposal facility, only 28% have sewerage system (partial without treatment facility in many cases) and 21% only low cost sanitary latrine facility. About 60% of the generated solid waste is collected and disposed of, of which only 50% sanitarily.

4. World Bank officials estimate there are 4.5 lakh deaths out of 57.5 crore cases of diarrhoea every year and a large segment of the country's 1.20 crore population defecates in the open.

5. Costain said the Indian economy loses $260 million (over Rs 1,000 crore) in tourism revenues due to poor sanitation as tourists are reluctant to come to India due to lack of sanitation facilities.

Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/India-loses-Rs-24000cr-annually...

Report: http://www.wsp.org/wsp/sites/wsp.org/files/publications/wsp-esi-india.pdf


82% of rural India deprived of basic needs

1. The survey of over one lakh households on basic living standards in India also says that 20% of rural households don't have access to either of these facilities, just 2% more than a similar figure for urban India, where 67.5 % enjoy all three. For India, the figure was 33%.

2. Although the report says that access to these three facilities in rural areas had tripled since 1993, it revealed an increase in the rural urban divide since then. The coverage in urban areas increased by about 20% as compared to 12% in rural areas between 1993 and 2008-09, says the report.

3. Nearly 57% of households in rural India have to travel up to five km every day to fetch drinking water as compared to just 20% in urban areas.

4. Just 30% of households in rural India have access to tap drinking water as compared to 74% in urban areas.

5. There is one areas where there is no rural-urban disparity. That is separate rooms for married couples. Around 75% of couples in both rural and urban India have a separate room.

Source: http://www.hindustantimes.com/News-Feed/newdelhi/82-of-rural-India-depri...


Toilets in India

1. In slum areas, where more than half of Mumbai lives, an average 81 people share a single toilet. In some places it rises to an eye-watering 273. Even the lowest average is still 58, according to local municipal authority figures.

2. In March, Mumbai's municipal authorities said there were 77,526 toilets in slum areas and 64,157 more were needed. Work is in progress on only 6,050.

3. The UN estimates that 600 million people or 55 percent of Indians still defecate outside.

4. Diseases like diarrhoea, which UNICEF says kills 1,000 Indian children aged under five every day.

5. Poor sanitation and the illnesses it causes cost the Indian economy 12 billion rupees (255 million dollars) a year, according to the health ministry.

Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/600-million-lack-toilets-in-Ind...

Bihar Assembly Election 2010 Data

Bihar Assembly Election 2010 Data



[TCN photo]

Bihar Cabinet





Partywise Result









Seats with 20% or more Muslim population




















Analysis of New MLAs of Bihar 2010 Assembly Elections:

1. 141 newly elected MLAs (i.e. 59%) in Bihar Assembly Elections 2010 have pending criminal cases against them according to their self sworn affidavits. In 2005 Bihar Assembly, 117 (i.e.35%) MLAs had pending criminal cases.

2. 85 MLAs out of these 141 analyzed have declared pending serious IPC charges like murder and attempt to murder charges against them. In 2005, 68 MLAs had serious pending criminal cases.

3. 76 MLAs analyzed (32%) have not declared their PAN card details.

4. A total of 47 MLAs (i.e. 20%) analyzed are crorepatis in Bihar Assembly Elections 2010. In 2005, 8 MLAs were crorepatis.





Source: http://adrindia.org/files/Final%20Bihar%20MLAs%20reportv3_1.pdf






Bihar Election 2010


Black Money in India

Black Money in India ( Global Financial Integrity Report 2010)

1. India is losing nearly Rs.240 crore every 24 hours, on average, in illegal financial flows out of the country. India’s aggregate illicit flows are more than twice the current external debt of US $230 billion.

2. The nation lost $213 billion (roughly Rs.9.7 lakh crore) in illegal capital flight between 1948 and 2008. These illicit financial flows were generally the product of: tax evasion, corruption, bribery and kickbacks, and criminal activities.

3. Over $125 billion (Rs.5.7 lakh crore) of that was lost in just this decade between 2000-2008.In just five years from 2004-08 alone, the country lost roughly Rs.4.3 lakh crore to such outflows.

4. Had India managed to avoid this staggering loss of capital, the country could have paid off its outstanding external debt of $230.6 billion (as of end-2008) and have another half left over for poverty alleviation and economic development.

5. Total capital flight represents approximately 16.6 per cent of India's GDP as of year-end 2008.

6. The total value of (such) illicit assets held abroad represents about 72 per cent of the size of India's underground economy which has been estimated at 50 per cent of India's GDP (or about $640 billion at end-2008) by several researchers. This implies that only about 28 per cent of illicit assets of India's underground economy are held domestically.

7. From 1948 through 2008 the Indian private sector shifted away from deposits into developed country banks and moved more of its money into offshore financial centers (OFCs). The share of OFC deposits increased from 36.4 percent in 1995 to 54.2 percent in 2009.

8. Some 68 percent of India’s aggregate illicit capital loss occurred after India’s economic reforms in 1991, indicating that deregulation and trade liberalization actually contributed to/accelerated the transfer of illicit money abroad.High net-worth individuals and private companies were found to be the primary drivers of illicit flows out of India's private sector.

Report: http://india.gfip.org/

Source: http://www.thehindu.com/opinion/op-ed/article892140.ece

Charity in India

“World Giving Index”

1. The “World Giving Index”, the largest study ever carried out into charitable behaviour across the globe has found that happier people are more likely to give money to charity than those who are wealthy

2. The “World Giving Index” used a Gallup survey on the charitable behaviour of people in 153 countries representing 95% of the world’s population.

3. The survey asked people whether they had given money to charity in the last month and to rank how happy they are with life on a scale of one to ten. The study also measured two other types of charitable behaviour alongside giving money – volunteering time and helping a stranger.

4. Australia and New Zealand topped the “World Giving Index”. Malta was found to be the country with the largest percentage of the population (83%) giving money, the people of Turkmenistan are the most generous with their time with 61% having given time to charity and Liberia was top of the list for helping a stranger (76%).

5. Canada,Ireland, Switzerland, USA, Netherlands, United Kingdom, Sri Lanka and Austria
are on the top of the list.

6. India has ranked 134th with only 14% of Indian giving money, 12% giving time and only 30% helping the stranger.

7. In South Asia, Sri Lanka is placed 8th, Nepal 100th, Pakistan 142nd and Bangladesh 146th in this list. War torn Afghanistan is ranked 39th just above Finland and Sweden in the list. Myanmar has ranked 22nd in the list.

Full report: http://www.cafonline.org/pdf/0882A_WorldGivingReport_Interactive_070910.pdf

Children

State of the World's Children 2011 (Unicef Report)

1. The future of adolescent girls in India seems dismal with a vicious cycle of underweight adolescence, child marriage and maternal mortality. More than half of them ( 56 per cent) are anaemic and 43 per cent are married off before the age of 18.

2. The appalling nutritional figures for adolescents puts India in the company of least developed nations such as Congo, Burkina Faso and Guinea.

3.India, in fact, beats even sub- Saharan Africa with the highest underweight adolescent girl population of 47 per cent in age group of 15 to 19 years. The country has the world's largest adolescent girl population ( 20 per cent).

4. According to the report, 43 per cent of girls were married off before the age of 18 and more than half of them gave birth before they turned adults.

5. India also displays very glaring gender disparities. While 30 per cent of boys between the ages of 15 and 19 years are anaemic, 56 per cent girls in the same age group suffer from the condition.

6. The adolescent birth rate also stands at 45 - the number of births per thousand women between the ages of 15 and 19 years.

7. About 57 per cent of the poorest children in the country are underweight compared to 20 per cent of the richest.

8. The risk of HIV infection is considerably higher in young females than young males. While 35 per cent of boys had knowledge of HIV and AIDS, only 28 per cent girls are adequately informed.

India's appalling figures

56 per cent girls are anaemic, on par with Congo, Burkina Faso & Guinea

47 per cent girls in the age group of 15 - 19 year are underweight - the highest underweight adolescent girl population

43 per cent of girls were married off before the age of 18. Only Bangladesh, Niger and Chad have higher figures

22 per cent gave birth before they turned 18

6,000 adolescent mothers die every year.

School attendance dropped from 86 per cent at primary level to 64 per cent for secondary schooling

For girls, school attendance dropped sharply as they move from primary to secondary school - from 83 per cent to 59 per cent

Source: http://indiatoday.intoday.in/site/Story/130959/latest-headlines/un-repor...

Report: http://www.unicef.org/publications/files/SOWC_2011_Main_Report_EN_022420...

http://www.unicef.org/sowc2011/pdfs/Table-1-Basic-Indicators_02092011.pdf


Girls Marriage (NCW Report)

1. Around 70 per cent of girls are below 18 at the time of their marriage in Hindi-speaking states like Uttar Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan and Bihar.

2. 73 per cent girls under 18 marry in Madhya Pradesh followed by Rajasthan 68 per cent, Bihar 67 per cent and Uttar Pradesh 64 per cent.

3. In Andhra Pradesh too 71 per cent girls tied the knot while still below 18.

Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/70-girls-in-Hindi-belt-marry-be...


Violence in Schools (Plan International 2010 report)

1. Corporal punishment is widespread in Indian schools, despite being illegal. More than 65% children, its report claimed, said they were beaten. A majority of such victims are in state schools.

2. The study also discovered that caste and gender discrimination was the major cause of violence against children. It said many students abandoned their studies because of such humiliation, which included hitting with hands or sticks, making them stand in various positions for long periods and tying them to chairs. More boys (54%) than girls (45%) were subjected to corporal punishment.

3. Interestingly, many among the students interviewed believed corporal punishment was sometimes necessary. Students in Assam, Mizoram and UP reported highest rates of corporal punishment, while Rajasthan and Goa the lowest.

4. In India, 69% of children said they had been physically abused in different settings, including schools, but most said they had not reported it to anyone

5. In total, 12,500 school kids in 13 states between five and 18, as well as otherwise, took part in the research.

6. India is dubiously ranked third among 13 countries in terms of estimated economic cost of corporal punishment. Plan calculated that anything between $1.4 billion and $7.4 billion was lost every year in India by way of social benefits because of physical ill-treatment in schools.

Report: http://plan-international.org/files/global/publications/campaigns/Plan%2...

Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/More-than-50-Indian-kids-face-s...


Child Labour( ILO ‘Accelerating action against child labour’ 2010 report)

1. India has 445 million children, Bangladesh 64 million, and Pakistan 70 million, as compared to, for example, China’s 348 million.

2. In sheer numbers, India and Pakistan have by far the largest out-of-school child population in the world.

3. India still devotes about the same proportion of national income to education (about 3.5%) that it did in the mid-1980s.

4 Four states account for 40% of the country’s child workers.

Report: http://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/---dgreports/---dcomm/documents/...

Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/India/Most-child-labourers-found-in-A...


Child Health ( UNICEF report 2009)

1. India has a whopping 61 million stunted children, the largest in any country,distantly followed by China that has 12 million children.

2. 3 out of 10 stunted children in the World are from India

3. Stunted growth is a consequence of long-term poor nutrition in early childhood. Stunting is associated with developmental problems and is often impossible to correct. A child who is stunted is likely to experience a lifetime of poor health and underachievement, a growing concern in India that is demographically a young nation.

4. Astoundingly more than 90% of the developing world's stunted children live in Africa and Asia.

Source: http://www.unicef.org/sowc09/report/report.php


Child Health (Save the Children-2009 Report)

1) A child dies every 15 seconds in India due to neonatal diseases while 20 lakh children die before reaching their fifth birthday.

2) Over four lakh newborns are dying every year within 24 hours of life in the country.

3) Over 20% of the world’s child deaths occur in India — the largest number anywhere in the world.

4) One in three of all malnourished children in the world live in India.

5) Around 46% of children under three are underweight in India.

6) Around 28% of child deaths are linked just to poor sanitation and unsafe drinking water

7) India's child mortality statistics are particularly poor, with 72 deaths per 1,000 live births, higher than neighbouring countries such as Bangladesh.

Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/news/india/In-India-a-child-dies-ever...


Hunger in India (United Nations World Food Programme (WFP)-2009 Report):

1. India ranks 94th in the Global Hunger Index of 119 countries.

2. India is failing its rural poor with 230 million people being undernourished — the highest for any country in the world.

3. Malnutrition accounts for nearly 50% of child deaths in India as every third adult (aged 15-49 years) is reported to be thin (BMI less than 18.5).

4. More than 27% of the world's undernourished population lives in India while 43% of children (under 5 years) in the country are underweight.

5. More than 70% of children (under-5) suffer from anaemia and 80% of them don't get vitamin supplements.

6. According to the report, the proportion of anaemic children has actually increased by 6% in the past six years with 11 out of 19 states having more than 80% of its children suffering from anaemia.

7. The proportion of stunted children (under-5) at 48% is again among the highest in the world. Every second child in the country is stunted, according to the health ministry's figures.

8. Around 30% of babies in India are born underweight.

9. Almost 80% of rural households do not have access to toilets within their premises. The figure exceeds 90% in states like Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand, Orissa and MP.

Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/India-tops-world-hunger-chart/a...

Corruption

Corruption in India (TI’s Global Corruption Barometer survey-2010)

1. About 54% Indians paid a bribe in the past year. Extent of corruption in India is at levels comparable with Cambodia, Nigeria, Afghanistan, Senegal, Uganda and Liberia.

2. India is the ninth most corrupt country in the world, in a ranking of 86 countries, with 54% of people reporting having paid a bribe. War-torn Iraq (56%) and Afghanistan (61%) suffer worse levels than India, as do nations such as Liberia (89%), Uganda (86%), Nigeria (63%), Sierra Leone (71%), Senegal (56%) and Cambodia (84%).

3. The world average is 25%, while the Asia Pacific average is 11%. The European Union enjoys an average of 5%, as does North America (Canada is marginally less corrupt than the United States), while Latin America and North Africa reported an average of 36%. Sub Saharan Africa has an average of 56%, compared with India’s 54%.

4. ndians perceived political parties to be the most corrupt, ranking them 4.2 on a scale of one to five. Political parties are followed by Police (4.1), Parliament/legislature (4) and civil servants (3.5). Private sector, NGOs and judiciary are all seen to be similarly corrupt (3.1), with the media enjoying a marginally better rating at 3. Military (2.8) and religious bodies (2.9) enjoy better public confidence.

5. Seventy-four percent Indians believed that levels of corruption has increased during the last three years, compared with a world average of 56% and Asia-Pacific average of 47%.

Source: http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/7073774.cms

Report: http://www.transparency.org/policy_research/surveys_indices/gcb/2010


Corruption in India (TI 2010 report)

1. India this year is ranked at 87 among 178 countries, down three spots from 84 in 2009.

2. Marginal decline in India's integrity score to 3.3 in 2010 from 3.5 in 2007 and 3.4 in 2008 and 2009 on a scale from zero (perceived to be the highly corrupt) to 10 (low levels of corruption).

3. Somalia is considered the world’s most corrupt country with a score of 1.1 followed by Myanmar and Afghanistan, while Denmark, New Zealand and Singapore are perceived to be the least corrupt with scores of 9.3.

4. China is at the 78th position, indicating it is less corrupt than India. While Pakistan is shown as just a notch worse off than India, the US ranks fairly high at 22nd and is perceived to have relatively low levels of corruption. In Asia, Bhutan is perceived to be the least corrupt country.

5. India’s ranking has consistently dipped since 2006 when it was ranked 70 among 163 countries.

Report: http://www.transparency.org/policy_research/surveys_indices/cpi/2010/res...


Corruption in India (TI 2009 report)

1) Global Corruption Perception Index: India has been ranked 84th in the list of 180 countries in terms of public-sector corruption, which is perceived to be highly corrupt.

2)India's integrity score this year is 3.4, same as for the year 2008.With the exception of Bhutan, which has a score of 5.0, India with 3.4 is still at the top of all the South Asian countries. Nearly half out of 180 countries have scored three or even lower points; a clear indication that corruption is perceived to be rampant. Haiti, Iraq, Myanmar and Somalia have recorded the lowest score of less than 1.5.

Source: http://www.transparencyindia.org/CPI_2009_Press_Release_India.pdf

Most corrupt in India (TI-2009 report):
1.Political Parties
2.Public officials/Civil Servants
3.Parliament/ Legislature
4.Business/Private Sector
5.Judiciary
6.Media

Source: http://www.transparency.org/news_room/latest_news/press_releases/2009/20...


1. Bribe paid by BPL families in Jharkhand in 2008 was around Rs 16 crore.

2. The finding shows that corruption was highest in basic services which are free for BPL families like health, school education and water supply.

3. Corruption is also rampant in police department and schemes under NREGA, land record and banking.

Sourse: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/ranchi/Jharkhand-BPL-families-pa...

Economy

Best countries for business: Forbes' annual list ranks 127 nations on the basis of business climate in a country for entrepreneurs, investors and workers.

2009: 75 / 127
Trade freedom: 125
Technology: 64
Corruption: 75
Monetary freedom: 107
Red tape: 90
Personal freedom: 54
Investor protection: 30
Innovation: 30
Intellectual property rights: 44
GDP growth: 14

2008: 64

http://www.indianexpress.com/news/'India+ran.../436596/

Education

Education:

Illiteracy: India has 35% of the world’s total illiterates. [2008]

Out of school children: 320 lakh in 2001-02 | 76 lakh in 2007-08.

World Bank Report(2009):

1. 48 of every 100 students in India pursuing secondary education never go beyond that level.

2. India's gross enrolment rates (GER) in secondary school is 40 percent compared to 70 percent in East Asia and 82 percent in Latin America. Countries like Vietnam and Bangladesh which have lower per capita incomes than India have higher gross enrollment rates (GER) in secondary schools.

3. 40 million children were enrolled in secondary school in 2008. The majority of them were boys, children from the urban areas, and those who belonged to the wealthier segments of the population.

4. Enrollment varies greatly between states, from 92% in Kerala, 44% in Tamil Nadu, 22% in Bihar, and 4% in Jharkhand. 37% of secondary students fail, and 11% dropout before exam.

5. 75% of public funding for secondary schools comes from states. Less than 10% of this is for investment. While recurrent financing, mainly for teacher salaries, has been stable, the financing of new investments has declined.

6. 60% of the secondary school system is privately managed - through unaided and aided private schools. Private unaided schools provide 30% of total secondary enrollment nationwide (2004-05), up from 15% in 1993-94.

7. On average, government school teachers earn 3 times more than their counterparts in private schools.

(http://www.worldbank.org.in/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/COUNTRIES/SOUTHASIAEXT/INDIA...)


Primary-school Teacher Absence(World Bank Report 2002-03)

Country Absence Rate (%)
Bangladesh 16
Ecuador 14
India 25
Indonesia 19
Peru 11
Papua New Guinea 15
Uganda 27
Zambia 17

Source: http://siteresources.worldbank.org/DEC/Resources/37912_Ecuador.Teacher.A...


Missing Teachers(World Bank-Harvard University study-06)

1. 25 per cent of teachers were absent from school and only about half were teaching.

2. Rates of absenteeism varied from under 15 per cent in Maharashtra to 42 per cent in Jharkhand. The rates were found to be higher in the "poorer States."

3. Maharashtra had the lowest rate — 14.6 per cent. In Kerala it was 21.2 per cent, in Tamil Nadu 21.3 per cent, in Karnataka 21.7 per cent and in West Bengal 24.7 per cent. On the higher side. The rate was 34.4 per cent in Punjab, 37.8 per cent in Bihar, and 41.9 per cent in Jharkhand.

4. Categories of absence of teachers, the study found that it was 30.2 per cent in the case of head teachers, 22.2 per cent in the case of deputy heads, 23.1 per cent in respect of permanent or regular teachers, and 24 per cent in the case of contract/informal candidates.

5.Teacher absence was considerably lower in schools with better infrastructure, a potentially important pointer to the importance of working conditions.

Source: http://www.thehindu.com/2006/04/05/stories/2006040506971100.htm


Teacher and Pupil Ratio

1. The all-India teacher and pupil ratio for primary schools in 2005-06 stood at 1:46. But states like Bihar had a teacher to pupil ratio of 1:104, Jharkhand 1:79 and West Bengal 1:50.

Source: http://www.hindustantimes.com/rssfeed/newdelhi/Who-will-teach-the-teache...

Energy

 

 

State-wise Release of Funds for Solar Energy Programmes

(Rs. in Lakhs)

States & UTs/Financial Year

 

2005-06

 

2006-07

 

2007-08

Andhra Pradesh

49.8

44.2

42.00

Arunachal Pradesh

34.81

280.6

199.14

Assam

50

0

147.41

Bihar

9.12

22.95

25.94

Chandigarh

0.08

0

3.83

Chattisgarh

14.16

47.7

25.94

Delhi

17.5

8.5

16.40

Goa

0

13.25

1.68

Gujarat

36.97

280.59

95.15

Himachal Pradesh

1.77

505.62

123.52

Haryana

165.78

355.32

401.15

Jammu & Kashmir

3.2

210.33

248.17

Jharkhand

5.91

0

0

Karnataka

326.35

312.23

29.42

Kerala

74.54

0

5.72

Madhya Pradesh

3

129.01

2.02

Maharashtra

107.97

270.88

1045.49

Manipur

24.98

15.95

10.82

Meghalaya

154.76

424.78

493.21

Mizoram

110.71

100.9

97.35

Nagaland

6.98

94.9

0

Orissa

2.26

76.48

0.32

Pondicherry

5.09

2

4.80

Punjab

11.8

62.9

184.98

Rajasthan

246.16

396.82

411.87

Sikkim

0

110.14

111.44

Tamil Nadu

107.23

253.27

11.08

Tripura

1.71

0

109.98

Uttar Pradesh

174.99

171.85

85.29

Uttrakhand

273.23

1246.33

573.03

West Bengal

325.81

341.78

397.50

IREDA / Banks/Others

3465.76

1706.03

2708.30

Total

5812.43

7485.31

7701.30

State-wise
Manufacturers of Solar  Photovoltaic Cells
/Modules, Solar Water Heaters and Solar Cookers

 

S. No.

 

 

State

 

 

Solar
Cells

SPV
Modules

FPC
based Solar water heaters

ETC
based Solar water heaters

Box
type solar cookers

Concentrating
solar cookers

1.      
 

Andhra Pradesh

1

6

5

3

 

1

2.      
 

Gujarat

 

 

4

2

5

3

3.      
 

Haryana

 

 

 

1

 

 

4.      
 

Himachal Pradesh

 

 

1

 

 

 

5.      
 

Karnataka

3

6

27

8

 

4

6.      
 

Kerala

 

1

 

3

 

1

7.      
 

Madhya Pradesh

 

 

 

 

1

1

8.      
 

Maharashtra

 

1

15

13

 

4

9.      
 

Punjab

 

1

2

 

1

 

10.  
 

Rajasthan

 

1

 

 

 

1

11.  
 

Tamil Nadu

2

2

3

3

 

1

12.  
 

Uttar Pradesh

2

2

 

 

2

1

13.  
 

Uttrakhand

 

 

1

 

 

 

14.  
 

West Bengal

1

1

 

2

1

 

15.  
 

Delhi

 

 

1

8

1

4

 

Total

9

21

59

43

11

21

            This information
was given by the Minister of State for New and Renewable Energy, Shri Vilas Muttemwar
in a written reply to a question by Shri N.R. Govindarajar in the Rajya Sabha
today.

 

English in India

English in India:

1. Only 43.8% of class I kids could read the alphabets, even in big capital letters.
2. Gujarat is the worst with barely 25.3% class 1 children able to read capital letters. Bihar, Orissa, Assam and Jharkhand are only marginally better at 33.4%, 34.5%, 36% and 41.8%.
3. Karnataka, despite its hi-tech glitter, scores just as bad only 37% of class I kids could pass the simple English test.
4. In Kerala, the knowledge of English appeared the best with 85% of kids reading capital letters, West Bengal was way below at 57%.
5. In class V the all-India average of students who can read sentences is 25.7%, by class VIII it goes up to 60.2%.
6. Kerala, In class V only 54.5% children can read English sentences. In Gujarat it is abysmally low at 8%. In Tamil Nadu, only 19% children of class V can read sentences while in Uttar Pradesh it is 14%. Bihar remains more or less consistent at 31.3%.

source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/Just-44-Class-1-kids-know-Engli...

Foreign trade

EXPORTS UP BY 26.59% DURING MARCH 2008

FOREIGN TRADE DATA – APRIL-MARCH 2008

India’s exports during March, 2008 were valued at US $ 16282.79 million which was 26.59 per cent higher than the level of US $ 12862.40 million during March, 2007. In rupee terms, exports touched Rs.65710.71 crore, which was 16.04 per cent higher than the value of exports during March, 2007. Cumulative value of exports for the period April-March, 2008 was US$ 155512.49 million (Rs.625471.22 crore) as against US $ 126413.99 million (Rs.571779 crore) registering a growth of 23.02 per cent in Dollar terms and 9.39 per cent in Rupee terms over the same period last year.

India’s imports during March, 2008 were valued at US $ 23174.94 million representing an increase of 35.24 per cent over the level of imports valued at US $ 17136.46 million in March, 2007. In Rupee terms, imports increased by 23.96 per cent. Cumulative value of imports for the period April- March, 2008 was US $ 235910.73 million (Rs.949133.82 crore) as against US $ 185735.17 million (Rs.840506 crore) registering a growth of 27.01 per cent in Dollar terms and 12.92 per cent in Rupee terms over the same period last year.

Oil imports during March, 2008 were valued at US $ 8633.14 million which was 76.6 per cent higher than oil imports valued at US $ 4888.47 million in the corresponding period last year. Oil imports during April- March, 2008 were valued at US $ 77033.57 million which was 35.28 per cent higher than the oil imports of US $ 56945.25 million in the corresponding period last year.

Non-oil imports during March, 2008 were estimated at US $ 14541.79 million which was 18.73 per cent higher than non-oil imports of US $ 12247.99 million in March, 2007. Non-oil imports during April-March, 2008 were valued at US $ 158877.15 million which was 23.36 per cent higher than the level of such imports valued at US$ 128789.74 million in April- March, 2007.

The trade deficit for April- March, 2008 was estimated at US $ 80398.24 million which was higher than the deficit at US $ 59321.18 million during April- March, 2007.

Foreigners in India

Foreigners in India

1. The Home Ministry reports that 352,000 foreigners were registered in India as of December 31, 2007, just 0.03 percent of the population.

2. Students (8.2 percent) accounted for the highest percentage of foreigners in 2006, followed by employees (5.2 percent).

3. The 2001 census revealed that more than 6 million residents were born outside the country (including Indian citizens born abroad), but almost all (5.7 million) were from the neighboring countries of Bangladesh, Pakistan, and Nepal; Sri Lanka and Burma accounted for another 243,000.

4. Only 227,000 individuals were born outside of the region: 28 percent of them in Africa, 25 percent in the Middle East, and only 20 percent in Northern America, Europe, and Oceania combined.

Source: http://www.migrationinformation.org/Profiles/display.cfm?ID=745#16

Freedom

Religious Freedom : International Religious Freedom Report 2008
(http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/irf/2008/108500.htm)

Press Freedom Index: 120 out of 169 countries. [http://www.rsf.org/article.php3?id_article=24025]

Global Indian Diaspora

Indian Diaspora:

The term "Indian diaspora" refers to all persons of Indian descent living outside India, as long as they preserve some major Indian ethnocultural characteristics. Only nationals of Pakistan and Bangladesh are excluded from this term since those countries were part of the larger British India before 1947 and thus constitute a special case.

A common distinction with regard to ethnic Indians outside India, often referred to as overseas Indians, is made between non-resident Indians (NRIs), who hold Indian citizenship, and persons of Indian origin (PIOs), who do not.

Places with More than 100,000 Members

Asia

Myanmar: 2,902,000
Malaysia: 1,665,000
Sri Lanka: 855,025
Nepal: 583,599
Singapore: 307,000

Africa

South Africa: 1,000,000
Mauritius: 715,756
Reunion: 220,055
Kenya: 102,500

Oceania

Fiji: 336,829
Australia: 190,000

Caribbean

Trinidad & Tobago: 500,600
Guyana: 395,350
Suriname: 150,456

Northern America

USA: 1,678,765
Canada: 851,000

Europe

UK: 1,200,000
Netherlands: 217,000

Gulf

Saudia Arabia: 1,500,000
UAE: 950,000
Oman: 312,000
Kuwait: 295,000
Qatar: 131,000
Bahrain: 130,000
Yemen: 100,900

Source: http://www.migrationinformation.org/Profiles/display.cfm?ID=745


Remittances to India in Billions of US Dollars

Source Regions of Remittance Flows to India


Indian Immigrants in the United States

1. According to the US Census Bureau, there were over one million immigrants from India in the United States in 2000.

2. The foreign born from India (1 million) made up the third-largest immigrant group in 2000, following the foreign born from Mexico (9.2 million) and the Philippines (1.4 million). The fourth and fifth-largest immigrant groups in 2000 were from China (excluding Hong Kong and Taiwan) (988,857) and Vietnam (988,174).

3. Of the 31.1 million foreign born in the US, 3.3 percent were immigrants from India, according to the results of Census 2000.

4. According to Census 2000, California had the largest number of foreign born from India (198,201), followed by New Jersey (119,491), and New York (117,238). The remaining 10 states with the largest number of immigrants from India include Illinois (83,916), Texas (78,388), Pennsylvania (37,541), Michigan (36,323), Florida (32,295), Maryland (32,276), and Virginia (30,611).

5. Of the total foreign born from India in 2000, California had the largest proportion (19 percent), followed by New Jersey (12 percent), New York (11 percent), Illinois (8 percent), and Texas (8 percent). Combined, these five states accounted for 58 percent of the total Indian immigrant population.

6. The foreign-born population from India increased from 450,406 in 1990 to 1,022,552 in 2000, or by 572,146 persons, according to the results of Census 2000, representing an increase of 127 percent.

7. According to the results of Census 2000, the states that experienced the most rapid growth in their foreign-born populations from India include Idaho (517 percent), Oregon (419 percent), and Colorado (400 percent), followed by Georgia (271 percent), Washington (268 percent), Minnesota (260 percent), Wyoming (241 percent), Kentucky (221 percent), North Dakota (206 percent), and Nevada (193 percent).

8. Census 2000 shows that the foreign-born population from India in Georgia increased from 7,511 in 1990 to 27,834 in 2000, representing a 271 percent increase. Among all states and the District of Columbia, Georgia ranked seventh in the numeric growth and fourth in the percent growth of its Indian immigrant population.

9. According to the results of Census 2000, immigrants from India account for 0.4 percent of the total population of 281.4 million. In only one state – New Jersey (1.4 percent) – did the foreign born from India make up more than one percent of the total state population.

Source: http://www.migrationinformation.org/USFocus/display.cfm?ID=185

http://www.migrationinformation.org/pdf/MPI-Spotlight-on-Indian-Immigran...

Health

Best place to be a mother( Save the Children: 2010)

1. India is in the unenviable position of 73rd out of 77 middle-income countries.

2.India still ranks first out of 12 countries that account for two-thirds of under-five and maternal deaths in the world.

3. In India, the shortfall of ASHA workers is estimated at a huge 74,000 (government norm is one Asha for 1,000 population) and ANMs at 21,066 (one ANM for 5,000 population in plain areas and 3,000 for rural areas).

Report: http://www.savethechildren.org/publications/state-of-the-worlds-mothers-...

http://www.savethechildren.org/publications/state-of-the-worlds-mothers-...

Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/NEWS/India/India-among-worst-places-t...


Child Health (Save the Children-2009 Report)

1) A child dies every 15 seconds in India due to neonatal diseases while 20 lakh children die before reaching their fifth birthday.

2) Over four lakh newborns are dying every year within 24 hours of life in the country.

3) Over 20% of the world’s child deaths occur in India — the largest number anywhere in the world.

4) One in three of all malnourished children in the world live in India.

5) Around 46% of children under three are underweight in India.

6) Around 28% of child deaths are linked just to poor sanitation and unsafe drinking water

7) India's child mortality statistics are particularly poor, with 72 deaths per 1,000 live births, higher than neighbouring countries such as Bangladesh.

Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/news/india/In-India-a-child-dies-ever...


Blind in India(2009)

1. Nearly two million people are blind in India.
2. Around 66 percent of them are women.
3. As many as two million people in India are corneally blind. Every year, 30,000 more are added to this figure. Half of the people suffering from this can get their sight restored through corneal graft surgery. However, against the annual demand for 100,000 corneas, only 16,000 are available.

Source: http://www.twocircles.net/2009oct08/two_out_every_three_blind_india_are_...


Mental Health in India

1. There are over two crore Indians who suffer from serious mental illnesses; more than five crore from milder forms.
2. About 50-90 per cent of them do not have access to medical help.
3. The National Human Rights Commission (NHRC), in a report on mental health released in September 2008, said that the morbidity rate on account mental illness will be greater than that from cardiovascular diseases by 2010.

Source: http://www.expressbuzz.com/edition/story.aspx?Title=%E2%80%98Two+crore+I...


Sanitary Practices(World Health organisation and UNICEF 'Diarrhoea: Why Children Are Still Dying and What Can Be Done'):

1. Out of a total of 2.5 billion people worldwide that
defecate openly, 665 million belong to India.

2. Some 88 per cent of diarrhoeal deaths worldwide are attributable to unsafe water, inadequate sanitation and poor hygiene.

Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/India-has-largest-number-of-peo...


Diabetes (2009 Report)

1. India continues to be the “diabetes capital” of the world and by the year 2010 about 50.8 million people in the 20 to 79 age group in the country will have diabetes.

2. International Diabetes Federation (IDF), projects that by 2030 about 87 million people will have diabetes.

3. The number of Indians with ‘pre-diabetic’ condition of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) is also very high — about 39.5 million people will have IGT in 2010 and the number will be 64.1 million in 2030.

Source: http://beta.thehindu.com/health/medicine-and-research/article36011.ece

Hunger

55% of India's population poor( (Multi-dimensional Poverty Index- Developed by the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative (OPHI) for the United Nations Development Programmes (UNDP))

1. About 645 million people or 55% of India's population is poor as measured by this composite indicator made up of ten markers of education, health and standard of living achievement levels.

2. The new data also shows that even in states generally perceived as prosperous such as Haryana, Gujarat and Karnataka, more than 40% of the population is poor by the new composite measure, while Kerala is the only state in which the poor constitute less than 20%.

3. A person is defined as poor if he or she is deprived on at least 3 of the 10 indicators. By this definition, 55% of India was poor, close to double India's much-criticised official poverty figure of 29%. Almost 20% of Indians are deprived on 6 of the 10 indicators.

4. Half of all children in India are under-nourished according to the National Family Health Survey III (2005-06). Close to 40% of those who are defined as poor are also nutritionally deprived.

5. A comparison of the state of Madhya Pradesh and the sub-Saharan nation of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), which have close to the same population and a similar MPI (0.389 and 0.393 respectively), shows that nutritional deprivation, arguably the most fundamental part of poverty, in MP far exceeds that in the DRC.Nutritional deprivation contributes to almost 20% of MP's MPI and only 5% of the DRC's MPI.

6. Multi-dimensional poverty is highest (81.4% poor) among Scheduled Tribes within India's Hindu population, followed by Scheduled Castes (65.8%), Other Backward Class (58.3%) and finally the general population (33.3%).

7. Based on the MPI, Bihar has by far the most poor of any state in the country, with 81.4% of its population defined as poor, which is close to 12% more than the next worst state of Uttar Pradesh.

8. As per the Planning Commission's figures, 41.4% of Bihar and 32.8% of UP is poor. In a possible indication of inadequate access to health and education facilities which do not show up in income poverty, almost 60% of north-east India and close to 50% of Jammu & Kashmir are poor as per the MPI, while the Planning Commission figures are around 16% and 5% respectively.

Report: http://www.ophi.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/Country-Brief-India.pdf

Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/55-of-Indias-population-poor-Re...


Global Hunger Index 2010, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)

1. India has been ranked 67, way below neighbouring countries like China and Pakistan. China is rated much ahead of India at the ninth place, while Pakistan is at the 52nd place.

2. Among other neighbouring countries, Sri Lanka was at the 39th position and Nepal ranked 56 by index. Bangladesh listed at the 68th position.

3. India is home to 42% of the world's underweight children, while Pakistan has just 5%, it added.

4. The index rated 84 countries on the basis of three leading indicators -- prevalence of child malnutrition, rate of child mortality, and the proportion of people who are calorie deficient.

Source: http://www.ifpri.org/publication/2010-global-hunger-index

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/India-ranks-below-China-Pak-in-...

http://www.hindustantimes.com/india-news/TrackingHunger-statistics/track...


United Nations Millennium Development Goals report, 2010.

1. In 2005-2007, the proportion of undernourished people in South Asia had swelled to levels last seen in 1990.
2. The prevalence of hunger had increased from 20% in 2000-2002 to 21% in 2005-2007.
3. The regional average was 21% in 1990-92, indicating that no progress had been made in the last two decades in reducing hunger levels and that India — the dominant country in the region — will not be able to meet its millennium development goals.
4. According to UN figures, the employment to population ratio in South Asia fell to 56% in 2008 from 57% in 1998. The 2009 estimates put it even lower at 55%.
5. The proportion of employed people living under $1.25 a day jumped sharply from 44% in 2008 to 51% in 2009.

Report: http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/pdf/MDG%20Report%202010%20En%20r15%20-...

Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/Hunger-back-to-1990-levels-in-S...


Source: Hindustan Times


Hunger in India (United Nations World Food Programme (WFP)-2009 Report):

1. India ranks 94th in the Global Hunger Index of 119 countries.

2. India is failing its rural poor with 230 million people being undernourished — the highest for any country in the world.

3. Malnutrition accounts for nearly 50% of child deaths in India as every third adult (aged 15-49 years) is reported to be thin (BMI less than 18.5).

4. More than 27% of the world's undernourished population lives in India while 43% of children (under 5 years) in the country are underweight.

5. More than 70% of children (under-5) suffer from anaemia and 80% of them don't get vitamin supplements.

6. According to the report, the proportion of anaemic children has actually increased by 6% in the past six years with 11 out of 19 states having more than 80% of its children suffering from anaemia.

7. The proportion of stunted children (under-5) at 48% is again among the highest in the world. Every second child in the country is stunted, according to the health ministry's figures.

8. Around 30% of babies in India are born underweight.

9. Almost 80% of rural households do not have access to toilets within their premises. The figure exceeds 90% in states like Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand, Orissa and MP.

Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/India-tops-world-hunger-chart/a...


Hunger(Action Aid report 2009):

1. India, with 47 per cent of its children under the age of six malnourished, ranks below countries like Bangladesh and Nepal on the state of hunger.

2. 30 million more people have joined the ranks of the hungry since the mid-nineties. Whereas China cut hunger numbers by 58 million in ten years through strong state support for smallholder farmers.

3. On Hunger Index of developing countries, India ranked 22nd out 29 countries above Guinea Bissau, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Pakistan, Haiti, Burundi and Democratic Republic of Congo.

This index was developed keeping in mind country legal commitment to the right to food, their investment in agriculture and social protection, and their performance on hunger and child nutrition.

4. Brazil (Ranked 1st): within six years, the program Fome Zero (Zero Hunger) has introduced food banks, community kitchens and locally procured school meals along with simultaneous support for smallholder family farmers and
land reform settlers. The result: child malnutrition has fallen by 73 percent and child deaths by 45 percent.

5. China (Ranked 2nd): through heavy investment in supporting its poor farmers and a relatively equitable distribution of land, has reduced the number of undernourished people by 58 million between 1990 and 2001. Now less than 9 percent of the
population goes hungry.

6. Ghana (Ranked 3rd) has made food security a national priority and backed this with consistent support to smallholder farmers and democratic, stable governance.
Ghana has made remarkable strides in reducing hunger – especially for a low income country.

7. Vietnam (Ranked 4th) pursued equitable land reform and investment in smallholders, and with relatively strong social policies has made unprecedented progress, reducing poverty by half in the decade of the nineties, with comparatively low
levels of inequality.

8. Even Malawi (Ranked 5th), one of the poorest countries in the world, and burdened with a devastatinng HIV epidemic to boot – has reaped rich results within three short years. Through a massive boost of investment to small scale farmers, it has trebled production to halt a famine that threatened to leave nearly a third of its population hungry.

poor countries have made striking progress. On the other hand, some middle income countries have allowed rural misery to
deepen in the midst of growing wealth. Pakistan, for instance, is performing no better than desperately poor and conflict-torn countries such as Sierra Leone, despite having a per capita income over two and half times higher.India ranks
below Ethiopia and Cambodia.

Source: http://www.actionaid.org/docs/hungerfree_scorecards.pdf

Illiteracy

Illiteracy in India(The Education For All-Global Monitoring Report-09)

1. India still has the largest number of illiterate adults in the world.Out of the total 759 million illiterate adults in the world, India still has the highest number

2. Over half of the illiterate adults live in just four countries: Bangladesh, China, India and Pakistan.

3. Gender disparities remain deeply engrained, with 28 nations across the developing world having nine or fewer girls in school for every 10 boys.

4. The report said two-thirds of the total illiterate people are women.

5.On current trends, the world will be less than halfway towards this goal by 2015. India alone will have a shortfall of some 81 million literate people.

Source: http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0018/001865/186525E.pdf


data visualization by tableau public


data visualization by tableau public

India in the world

India's ranking in various world indices:

Human Development Index 2010

1. Rapid economic growth of the past decade has ensured India a place among the top 10 movers on GDP growth, but the country ranks a low 119 among 169 countries on the 2010 Human Development Index .

2. Life expectancy at birth is 64.4 years in India. In comparison, people living in countries such as Norway, Australia, New Zealand and many countries across Europe are expected to live beyond 80 years. The world average is 69.3 years. The Chinese are expected to live about 73.5 years

3. The number of years a person has spent in school is a dismal 4.4 years for India as compared to global average of 7.4 and 4.6 for South Asia.

4. Beginning 1980, India’s HDI values has increased from 0.320 to 0.519, an increase of 62%. In the same period, life expectancy at birth increased almost 9%, mean years of schooling by close to three years, and expected years of schooling by four years and per capita GNI by 254%.

Report: http://hdrstats.undp.org/en/countries/profiles/IND.html

http://hdr.undp.org/en/mediacentre/

Source: http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/economy/indicators/India-ranks-...


World Prosperity Index 2010

1. India has slipped 10 places to the 88th spot from 78th in 2009.

2. China is ranked 58th in the list of 110 countries, which is topped by Norway. Other countries in the top five are Denmark (2), Finland (3), Australia (4) and NewZeland (5).

3. China is ranked 58th in the list of 110 countries, which is topped by Norway. Other countries in the top five are Denmark (2), Finland (3), Australia (4) and NewZeland (5).

4. India has ranked low on education ground (89th in the Index), Governance (41st) health (95th), Safety & Security (78th), Personal Freedom (74th), entrepreneurship and opportunity (93rd), and social Capital (105th).

5.India Ranking in various Indices
Legatum Prosperity Index-- 88th / 110
Average Life Satisfaction Ranking -- 94th / 110
Per Capita GDP Ranking -- 86th / 110
WEF Global Competitiveness Index-- 51st / 139
UN Human Development Index-- 134th / 182
Heritage/WSJ Economic Freedom Index-- 124th / 179
TI Corruption Perceptions Index-- 84th / 180
Vision of Humanity Global Peace Index-- 128th / 149

5. On the lower end of the rankings were Zimbabwe (110), Pakistan (109), Central African Republic (108), Ethiopia (107) and Nigeria (106).

6. The Legatum Prosperity Index is the world's only global assessment of wealth and well being. It uses a holistic definition of prosperity, which includes factors ranging from economic growth to health and education, to personal freedom and governance

Report: http://www.prosperity.com/country.aspx?id=IN

http://www.prosperity.com/rankings.aspx

source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/India-slips-10-spots-to-88th-on...


Newsweek World's Best Countries List 2010

1. India ranks 78th on the World's Best Countries' list compiled by Newsweek magazine, which placed nations on the basis of health, education, economy and politics.

2. India ranking in various category:
Education: 88th
Health: 82nd
Quality of Life:87th
Economic Dynamism: 38th
Political Environment: 48th.

3. Nicaragua is on 75th followed by Honduras 76th and Bolivia on 77th. Iran is on 79th followed by Botswana on 80th and Vietnam on 81st.

4. India gets 2.5 for freedom of expression, political participation and electoral processes from Freedom House with 1 being the highest score. Pakistan scores low with 4.5.

5. In the 'ease of doing' business category, India gets 133th rank, according to World Bank, which puts 1 as the best place to do business.

Report: http://www.newsweek.com/2010/08/15/interactive-infographic-of-the-worlds...

Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/India-at-78th-spot-on-Newsweeks...


The Failed States Index

2010:
India is ranked 79 in a list of 177 countries. In India's immediate neighbourhood, Burma has been placed at 13, Sri Lanka (22) and Nepal 25. China is ranked at 57th place.

Dominic Republic, Saudi Arabia, Honduras and El Salvador are placed just above India in the list.

http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2010/06/21/2010_failed_states_inde...

2009: India was ranked 87.


Childrens' index: 76 out of 81 countries. [http://www.savethechildren.org/publications/mothers/2008/SOWM-2008-full-...


Child Marriage:More than a third of the world's child brides are from India.

Nearly 25 million women in India were married in the year 2007 by the age of 18.

(http://www.unicef.org/sowc09/index.php)


Child Labour: About 44 million, or 13 percent of all children in south Asia, are engaged in labour, with more than half in India.

(http://www.unicef.org/sowc09/index.php)


Global Hunger Index: 94 out of 118 countries [International Food Policy Research Institute, Washington]


Global Peace Index: 2010 ranking 128 out of 149 countries; 2009: 122; 2008: 107; 2007: 109
[ http://www.visionofhumanity.org/]


Happiness ranking: 69 out 98 countries (World Values Survey data)
[http://www.nsf.gov/news/newsmedia/pr111725/pr111725.pdf]


Legatum Prosperity Index:45 out of 104 countries

Average Life Satisfaction Ranking: 68th / 104
Per Capita GDP Ranking: 83rd / 104
WEF Global Competitiveness Index: 49th / 133
UN Human Development Index: 132nd / 179
Heritage/WSJ Economic Freedom Index: 123rd / 178
TI Corruption Perceptions Index: 85th / 180
Vision of Humanity Global Peace Index: 122nd / 144

Economic Fundamentals - Ranked 43rd
Given the size of the workforce, India has a very low level of fixed capital investment

Entrepreneurship and Innovation - Ranked 55th
There is an increasingly good environment for entrepreneurship but the reach of the high-tech export boom is surprisingly limited

Democratic Institutions - Ranked 36th
India is an imperfect, but functioning democracy

Education - Ranked 86th
Education is an area in which India needs to make considerable progress, despite the well publicised presence of an educated elite

Health - Ranked 88th
India suffers severe underinvestment in medical facilities

Safety and Security - Ranked 87th
India has the highest level of casualties from political violence of any country in the Index

Governance - Ranked 41st
While India ranks well for overall governance, alarming concerns about corruption are pervasive

Personal Freedom - Ranked 47th
Citizens give India moderately high scores with regard to personal freedom and tolerance towards minorities

Social Capital - Ranked 5th
Indian citizens report high levels of membership in community organisations, allowing for a broad network of social capital

Source: http://www.prosperity.com/country.aspx?id=IN


Human Development Index:
134 out of 182 countries(2009)
126 out of 177 countries (2008)

(http://hdr.undp.org/en/statistics/)


Mothers' index: ranked 66th out of 71 countries. [http://www.savethechildren.org/publications/mothers/2008/SOWM-2008-full-...


Press Freedom Index: 120 out of 169 countries. [http://www.rsf.org/article.php3?id_article=24025]


Women's index: 64 out of 71 countries.[http://www.savethechildren.org/publications/mothers
/2008/SOWM-2008-full-report.pdf]

Indian Rich

Indian Rich- World Wealth Report 2010

1. India now has 126,700 HNWIs, an increase of more than 50% over the 2008 number. HNWIs, in this context, are defined as those having investable assets of $1 million or more, excluding primary residence, collectibles, consumables, and consumer durables.

2. Just over 120,000 in number, or 0.01% of the population, their combined worth is close to one-third of India's Gross National Income (GNI).

3. At the peak of the recession in 2008, India had 84,000 HNWIs with a combined net worth of $310 billion.

4. It would take an average urban Indian 2,238 years, based on the monthly per capita expenditure estimates in the 2007-8 National Sample Survey, to achieve a net worth equal to that of the average HNWI. And that's assuming that this average urban Indian just accumulates all his income without consuming anything.

5. A similar calculation shows that an average rural Indian would have to wait a fair bit longer — 3,814 years!

6. The HNWI population in India is also expected to be more than three times its 2008 size by the year 2018.

7. An estimated 13.6 million more people in India became poor or remained in poverty than would have been the case had the 2008 growth rates continued, according to the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA).

8. The wealth is being spent on passion, art and luxury collection, which has increased from 27 per cent to 30 per cent.

Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/India/Rich-getting-richer-120k-Indian...

Report: http://www.capgemini.com/insights-and-resources/by-publication/world-wea...

Internet in India

Internet in Rural India

1. A seven-state survey that tracked rural internet awareness shows that about 84% were ignorant of the medium's existence. As per the primary research, there are 3.8 Mn claimed Internet users in the rural villages in these states.In these 7 states, there are 2.6 Mn active Internet users.

2. Of those who make use of the net, 85% access emails, 67% watch video and listen to music and 48% conduct educational research. Interestingly about 13% utilize the internet to know about latest farming techniques and 8% to find about fertilizers.

3. It shows that as compared to 2008, there is a 26.7% rise in the number of 'active' rural internet users in 2009: from 3.3 million in 2008 to 4.2 million in 2009. Those who have used the internet once or more in the past one month qualify as "active" users.

4. For All India, the number of Claimed Internet users is 6.46 Mn and there are 4.18 Mn Active Internet users. The Internet penetration for Rural India has increased from 0.97% in 2008 to 1.13% in 2009.

5.By the year 2010, the total number of Internet users in rural villages is will grow to 7.7 Mn of which 5.4 Mn will be Active Internet users resulting in 30% growth from the year 2009.

6. More than 70% of rural users access Internet through CSCs/cyber cafés. People, however, access cyber cafes that are located at distances greater than 10 km away, many more times than those possibly within 10 km of their village.

Source: http://www.iamai.in/Upload/Research/Internet_for_Rural_India_44.pdf


Internet in India

1. 71 million people claimed to have used internet in 2009.
2. Active users, those who use internet at least once a month according the international standards of reckoning, rose from 42 million in September 2008 to 52 million in September 2009.
3. Internet usage has gone up from 9.3 hrs/week to 15.7 hrs/week .

Source: http://www.iamai.in/PRelease_Detail.aspx?nid=2045&NMonth=4&NYear=2010

Judiciary

Pending cases in India

1. Indian judiciary would take 320 years to clear the backlog of 31.28 million cases pending in various courts including High courts in the country.
2. Every judge in the country will have an average load of about 2,147 cases.
3. India has 14,576 judges as against the sanctioned strength of 17,641 including 630 High Court Judges. This works out to a ratio of 10.5 judges per million population.
4. The Apex court in 2002 had suggested 50 judges per million population.

Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/Courts-will-take-320-years-to-c...


The Law Commission in its 120th Report recommended that the strength of judges per million population may be increased from 10.5 to 50 judges. The present judge strength in India is 14 per million population (approx.). Government has already increased the Judge strength in the High Courts by 152.

With regard to subordinate judiciary, the Supreme court, in its judgement of 21st March, 2002, in All India Judges’ Association & Ors Vs. Union of India & Ors., directed that an increase in the Judge strength from the existing 10.5 per 10 lakh people to 50 judges per 10 lakh people should be effected and implemented within a period of five years in a phased manner to be determined and directed by the Union Ministry of Law. The Central Government have filed an affidavit in the Supreme Court praying that the increase in judge strength in the Union Territories for which Central Government is administratively responsible be allowed based on workload and pendency of cases. The matter is sub-judice. As directed by the apex court, the Central Government also filed an affidavit indicating the quantum of funds required in compliance of the aforesaid Supreme Court’s judgement irrespective of the category of funds that will be drawn.

All State Governments are also party to this case. Under article 235 of the Constitution of India, the administrative control over the members of subordinate judiciary in the States vests with the concerned High Court and the State Government. Accordingly, the Central Government has requested all the State Governments for taking necessary action to increase the judge strength as per the direction of the Supreme Court and also to fill up the vacant posts of judicial officers on urgent basis.

Middle Class in India

Middle Class in IndiaAsian Development Bank 2010 Report

1. Vast majority of this middle class earns between Rs 1,000 and Rs 2,000 per person per month.

2. Only 0.0009% of Indians earn more than Rs 10,000 per month.

3. India will have a billion strong Middle Class by 2030.

4. The ADB report defines the middle class as those earning between $2 and $20 per person per day, measured in international dollars, ie adjusted for purchasing power parity. The ADB splitted the middle class into three sub-sections: lower middle class ($2 - $4), middle middle ($4 - $10) and upper middle ($10 - $20).

5. The vast majority of the Indian middle class 82% of it, or 224 million people - however, fit into the first category.

6. Since $1 PPP is Rs 17.256, this means that the vast majority of the Indian middle class earns between Rs 1035 and Rs 2070.

7. The ADB report shows that middle-class Indians systematically define themselves as poorer than they actually are in surveys.

Report: http://www.adb.org/Documents/Books/Key_Indicators/2010/pdf/KI2010-Specia...

http://www.adb.org/Documents/Books/Key_Indicators/2010/pdf/IND.pdf

Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/Most-of-Indian-middle-class-ear...

Mobile phone subscribers

Mobile phone connections - 2010

1. India's mobile phone market added 18.98 million new subscribers to its network in October, taking the total number of connections to 706.69 million.

2. According to the Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI), the wireless phone user base grew 2.76 percent to 706.69 million in October from 687.71 million in the previous month.

3. The total telephone subscriber base in the country, both wireless and wireline connections combined, touched 742.12 million. The overall tele-density reached 62.51 percent.

4. The growth in India's wireless phone category was led by Bharti Airtel, which added three million users to take its subscriber base to 146 million users.

Vodafone Essar was next with 2.49 million new subscribers, that raised its subscriber base to 118 million, while new telecom player Uninor added 2.48 million connections, toting up 13.74 milion subscribers.

5. The broadband subscriber base grew 2.24 percent from 10.29 million in September to 10.52 million in October 2010.

6. Wireline subscriber base declined from 35.57 million in September-2010 to 35.43 million at the end of October 2010.

7. Bharat Sanchar Nigam Ltd (BSNL) and Mahanagar Telephone Nigam Ltd (MTNL), the two state-run operators, hold 83.31 percent of the wireline market share.

Source: http://www.hindustantimes.com/News-Feed/sectorsinfotech/India-has-706-mi...

Report: http://www.trai.gov.in/annualreport/AnnualReport_09_10English.pdf


The total
mobile subscriber base has increased from 56.88 million in March 2005 to 261.08
million in March 2008.The details of mobile phone subscriber base during the
last three years and the current year along with the growth rate, State-wise,
year-wise are given below:

 

Circle/State-wise details of Mobile phones  for the last three years  w.e.f. 31.03.2005

 

Sr. No.

Name of
Circle/ State

Total
Mobile phones as on

Growth
rate (in %) during the year

31.03.2005

31.03.2006

31.03.2007

31.03.2008

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

1

Andaman & Nicobar

10740

32587

44083

57846

203.42

35.28

31.22

2

Andhra Pradesh

4251239

7669812

13045794

20577632

80.41

70.09

57.73

3

Assam

287002

1128597

2331898

3913099

293.24

106.62

67.81

4

Bihar

1158534

3819442

5773370

10869459

229.68

51.16

88.27

5

Chhattisgarh

117951

191417

467294

701032

62.29

144.12

50.02

6

Gujarat

4239010

6775707

11163757

16968200

59.84

64.76

51.99

7

Haryana

1252666

2240298

4470606

6401457

78.84

99.55

43.19

8

Himachal
Pradesh

354255

728578

1408876

2299811

105.66

93.37

63.24

9

Jammu & Kashmir

274821

1114652

1491315

2201912

305.59

33.79

47.65

10

Jharkhand

206372

403371

571217

640229

95.46

41.61

12.08

11

Karnataka

3913203

6890546

11382511

17043556

76.08

65.19

49.73

12

Kerala

2826014

5019928

7601981

11698216

77.63

51.44

53.88

13

Madhya Pradesh

1871031

3441142

6682326

12491306

83.92

94.19

86.93

14

Maharashtra (-)
Mumbai

4657918

7417194

12788896

21079326

59.24

72.42

64.83

15

North East

146606

500935

1201518

2118532

241.69

139.86

76.32

16

Orissa

762996

2172208

2963261

5180156

184.69

36.42

74.81

17

Punjab

3763822

5461829

8364307

11715504

45.11

53.14

40.07

18

Rajasthan

1852881

4147323

8011334

13586738

123.83

93.17

69.59

19

Tamil Nadu (-) Chennai

3624160

5957147

10553554

18284050

64.37

77.16

73.25

20

Uttarakhand

156467

321779

544882

685565

105.65

69.33

25.82

21

Uttar Pradesh

4442433

9907365

17561905

28366704

123.02

77.26

61.52

22

West Bengal (-) Kolkata

895338

2732985

5040111

9381095

205.25

84.42

86.13

23

Kolkata

2019998

3502096

5030986

7844469

73.37

43.66

55.92

24

Chennai

2228248

3246131

4637124

7061200

45.68

42.85

52.28

25

Delhi

6073819

8869702

12083283

16282949

46.03

36.23

34.76

26

Mumbai

5501404

8116905

9877466

13631670

47.54

21.69

38.01

Total

56888928

101809676

165093655

261081713

78.96

62.16

58.14

 

Note:    (1)     
Source  BSNL
/ MTNL / COAI / AUSPI.

(2)       

Figures include WLL (F) also.

(3)       

Private operators provide data service area wise
only and not separately for Andaman & Nicobar, Jharkhand, Uttarakhand, Chhattishgarh and NE-II which are included in
West
Bengal
, Bihar, Uttar
Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh and North East – I respectively. However, Bharti Airtel provides landline
figures separately for Chhattisgarh and Madhya
Pradesh

 

            Telecom
Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) monitors the performance of mobile service
providers against the quality of service benchmarks notified in the Regulations
issued by TRAI, through quarterly Performance Monitoring Reports obtained from
telecom operators. TRAI also monitors the congestion at the point of
interconnection (POI) through monthly congestion report. The telecom service
providers are making efforts to improve the quality by continuously augmenting
their mobile network infrastructure and optimizing the same to meet the
specified standards set by TRAI.

 

             This
information was given by the Minister of  Communications and Information Technology,  Shri A. Raja  in a written reply to starred question in the Lok Sabha today.

Muslims in India

This survey was conducted across three segments of Muslims - students of minority institutions, students of madrasas and the rest of the community. Respondents from minority colleges are denoted by a blue dot, those from madrasas by a green dot and the rest of India by a yellow dot.













Source: Thesundayindian.com

http://www.thesundayindian.com/article.php?category_id=7&article_id=10780#


Muslim representation in Police Force



Source: The Telegraph

http://www.telegraphindia.com/1100510/jsp/frontpage/story_12431527.jsp



Data related to Indian Muslim from Sachar Report


Distribution of Population of each Religion by Caste Categories

Incidence of Never Attended and Drop-Outs

Religion

SCs

STs

OBCs

Others

Hindu

22.2

9.1

42.8

26.0

Muslim

0.8

0.5

39.2

59.5

Christians

9.0

32.8

24.8

33.3

Sikhs

30.7

0.9

22.4

46.1

Jains

0.0

2.6

3.0

94.3

Buddhists

89.5

7.4

0.4

2.7

Zoroastrians

0.0

15.9

13.7

70.4

Others

2.6

82.5

6.2

8.7

Total

19.7

8.5

41.1

30.8


Trends in Population Shares and Growth, India, 1961-2001




Muslim Population in Selected states-2001




No. of Districts by Muslim Population Size and Concentration, 2001 Census

Muslim Population in the
district

Number of districts

Percentage of Muslims in
the total populations of the district

Number of districts

1,000,000 or more

25

75 or more

9

500,000 to 999,999

51

50 or more but less than 75

11

250,000 to 499,999

104

25 or more but less than 50

38

100,000 to 249,999

125

10 or more but less than 25

182

50,000 to 99,999

87

5 or more but less than 10

129

10,000 to 49,999

95

1 or more but less than 5

147

Less than 10,000

106

Less than 1

77

Total

593

Total

593


Age-Sex Distribution of All Population and Muslim Population, India, 2001 (Percentage)

Age Group

All religious

Muslim

Male

Female

Male

Female

0-4

10.7

10.7

12.4

12.7

5-9

12.5

12.4

14.7

14.7

10-14

12.3

11.9

14.0

13.7

15-19

10.1

9.3

10.8

10.1

20-24

8.7

8.8

8.7

8.6

25-29

7.8

8.4

7.2

7.8

30-34

7.0

7.4

6.3

6.7

35-39

6.8

7.0

6.1

6.3

40-44

5.6

5.2

4.9

4.5

45-49

4.7

4.5

3.9

3.8

50-54

3.7

3.4

3.1

2.7

55-59

2.6

2.8

2.0

2.3

60-64

2.6

2.8

2.1

2.2

65
+

4.5

5.0

3.5

3.8

Age
not stated

0.3

0.2

0.3

0.2

Total

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0


District-wise Concentration of Muslim Population




Trends in Sex Ratio, All Population and Muslim Population, India, 1961-2001




Child Sex Ratio (females aged 0-5 years per 1,000 Males aged 0-5 years) by SRCs, 1998-99




Child Sex Ratio (females aged 0-5 years per 1,000 males aged 0-5 years) among SRCs by region, 1998-99




Percent change in Child Sex Ratio (females aged 0-5 per 1,000 males aged 0-5) between 1992-93 and 1998-99, by SRC's




Trend in Urbanisation, All Population and Muslim Population, India, 1961-2001




Infant and under-five mortality rates (per 1,000 live births) by SRC's, 1998-99




Mortality among SRC's, by Geographical Region, 1998-99




Percent Decline in Infant and Under-five Mortality Rates among SRC's, 1993-94 to 1998-99




Religious Differentials in Fertility, India




Contraceptive Prevalence Rate, India




Large States Classified according to Level of Fertility and Share of Muslim Population,India, NFHS-2

Level of fertility

Range
of TFR

All
Population

Muslim
Population

Moderately High

Greater than 4.0 but

Less than/equal to 5.0

Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar

Moderate

Greater than 3.0 but Less than/equal to 4.0

Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan, Bihar, Madhya Pradesh

INDIA, Madhya Pradesh, West Bengal, Maharashtra,
Gujarat, Assam

Moderately Low

Greater
than 2.2 but Less than/equal to 3.0

INDIA,
Gujarat, Jammu and Kashmir, Maharashtra, West Bengal, Assam, Andhra Pradesh

Karnataka,
Jammu and Kashmir, Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Andhra Pradesh

Low

Less than/equal to 2.2

Tamil Nadu, Karnataka,

Kerala


Percentage of children under 5 who are Underweight and Stunted and% of low birth weight (




Percentage of children under 5 who are Underweight and Stunted among SRC's, by geographical region, 1998-99




Literacy by Place of Residence




Literacy Levels in Andhra Pradesh




Literates as Proportion of Population by Age Groups - 2004-05

Age Group

Hindus

Muslims

Other Minorities

Gen

OBC

SCs/STs

6-13 years

90.2

80.8

74.7

74.6

88.5

14-15 years

95.7

87.5

80.0

79.5

91.9

16-17 years

95.0

85.2

78.6

75.5

91.3

18-22 years

91.4

76.9

65.0

70.5

85.8

23 years & above

74.0

50.6

36.5

46.1

67.0

Total

80.5

63.4

52.7

59.9

75.2


All India - Literacy rates by Social Groups – 2001





Mean Years of Schooling of Children aged 7-16 years (2001)




Current Enrolment Rates 1999-00 and 2004-05




Differences in Attendance (Enrolment) Levels between Muslims and All Others




Incidence of Never Attended and Drop-Outs




Percentage Attainment Levels in SRCs




All India - Matriculation (Completion Rates)





Percentage of Muslim Children in JNVST




Graduates and Diploma Holders by SRCs

SRCs

Number (in lakhs)

Percentage of 20 years+Population

Distribution across SRCs

Graduates

Diploma and Certificates

Graduates

Diploma and Certificates

Graduates

Diploma and Certificates

Total

376.7

40.5

6.7

0.7

100

100

Muslim

23.9

2.7

3.6

0.4

6.3

6.8

SCs/STs

30.8

4.1

2.4

0.3

8.2

10.2

All Others

322

33.7

8.8

0.9

85.5

83.0


Graduates from among age 20+ by SRCs: 2004-05




Graduates + as Percentage of 20+ Population: 2004-05




Technical Graduates as Percentage of 20+Population: 2004-05




Diplomas as Percentage to 20+Population: 2004-05




All India - Graduation (Completion Rates)





Graduates as Proportion of Population by Age Groups - All India, 2004-05

Age Group

Hindus

Muslims

Other Minorities

Gen

OBCs

SCs/STs

20-30 years

18.6

6.5

3.3

4.5

11.6

30-40 years

16.8

4.6

2.3

3.3

9.2

40-50 years

14.6

3.2

1.5

2.8

8.1

51 years & above

9.8

1.9

0.9

2.1

5.7

Total

15.3

4.4

2.2

3.4

8.9


Admission process of IIMs and Share of Muslim students




Percentage Muslim Students in IITs




Proportion of Muslims in Premier Arts/Sc./Comm.Colleges




Proportion of Muslims in Premier Medical Colleges




Distribution of Students Enrolled in Undergraduate courses: 2004-05




Distribution of Students Enrolled in PG courses 2004-05




Children Currently Studying as a Proportion of Population by Age Groups - 2004-05

Age Groups

Hindus

Muslims

Other Minorities

Gen

OBCs

SCs/STs

6-13 years

19.1 (17.3)

36.1 (35.5)

25.7 (27.4)

14.0 (15.1)

5.1 (4.8)

14-15 years

24.3 (19.9)

36.1 (35.2)

21.4 (25.2)

12.2 (14.5

6.0 (5.3)

16-17 years

28.9 (21.1)

33.7 (35.0)

20.2 (24.7)

10.7 (14.0)

6.3 (5.1)

18-22 years

34.0 (20.8)

30.5 (34.4)

17.7 (25.5)

10.2 (13.9)

7.6 (5.5)

23 years & above

35.6 (23.9)

29.2 (35.1)

18.3 (24.1)

7.4 (10.9)

9.5 (5.9)


Incidence of Graduation and those Pursuing Post-Graduate Studies among Poor and non-Poor Households according to SRCs: 20-30 Age Group - 2004-05

SRCs

20-30 years old persons

Graduates

Attending PG cources

Unemployment Rates among Graduates

Percentage to population

Distribution across SRCs

Percentage of population in the age group

Distribution across SRCs (SRCs)

Percentage of graduates in the SRCs

Distribution across SRCs
(%age)

Non-Poor

SCs/STs

66.3

21.8

3.8

10.1

21.5

8.9

19.1

H-OBCs

78.5

35.1

6.2

26.6

22.1

24.2

23.8

H-General

89.2

25.5

15.7

48.9

26.6

53.4

20.5

Muslims

71.2

11.4

4.9

6.8

22.9

6.4

25.6

All Minorities

86.1

6.2

10.1

7.6

22.4

7.2

25.3

Total

77.3

100

8.2

100

24.4

100

21.4

Poor

SCs/STs

33.7

37.7

0.8

17.4

27.6

19.6

9.8

H-OBCs

33.7

32.7

1.7

30.8

23.0

29.0

16.2

H-General

10.8

10.5

5.8

34.9

29.3

41.9

14.4

Muslims

28.8

15.7

1.2

10.5

16.3

7.0

16.7

All Minorities

13.9

3.4

3.4

6.4

9.5

2.5

17.4

Total

22.7

100

1.8

100

24.4

100

12.7


Distribution of Enrolled Muslim Children aged 7-16 Years by Type of School




Distribution of ‘All Other’ Enrolled Children aged 7-16 Years by Type of School




Madarsa going Muslim Students (NCAER,Prov)




Proportion of Madarsa Going Children - Provisional Estimate




Percentage of Muslim Children aged 7-19 years in Maktabs




Urdu Speaking Population and Enrolment in Urdu Medium Schools, 2004




Performance in CBSE Examination




Urdu Education Opportunities in Karnataka




Minority Language Primary Schools




Teachers In Minority Language Primary Schools




Teachers In Minority Language High Schools




Worker Participation Rates by SRCs




Unemployment Rate by SRCs




Activity Status by SRCs in Urban and Rural Areas by SRCs




Activity Status of Male and Female Workers




Share of Regular Workers in Each SRCs Employed in Government Sector and in Large Private Enterprises, 2004-05




Participation in Informal Sector by SRCs




Share of Workers in Each SRC according to Location of Work




Share of Workers in Each SRC in Selected Industrial Groups, 2004-05




Growth Based Categorization of Industry Groups

Category A: Growth industries with good quality employment

A1.Growing value added, employment and labour productivity

A2.Growing value added and labour productivity but declining employment

Category B: Growth industries with poor quality employment

B1.Growing value added and employment but declining labour productivity

B2.Growing value added but declining employment and labour productivity

Category C: Non-growth industries

C1.Growing employment but declining value added and labour productivity

C2.Growing labour productivity but declining employment and value added

C3.Declining value added, employment and labour productivity


Growth Experience of Manufacturing Sectors with Concentration of Muslim Workers, Unorganized Sector




Share of Workers in Each SRC in selected Occupation Groups , 2004-05




Distribution of Regular Workers of Each SRC by Conditions of Work




Worker Population Ratios (WPR) by Socio-Religious Categories, 2004-05 (Principal and Subsidiary Status, (15-64 years)




Unemployment Rate by Social Religious Categories, All Age Groups, Daily Status




Distribution of Male and Female Workers in Each Socio-Religious Category by Activity Status 2004-05, All Workers (Principal and Subsidiary, aged 15-64)




Distribution of Workers in Each Socio-Religious Category by Activity Status and Place of Residence - 2004-05, All Workers (Principal and Subsidiary, aged 15-64)




Distribution of Workers in Each Socio- Religious Categories by Enterprise-Type in Rural and Urban Areas, 2004-05, (All workers aged 15-64 years)




Distribution of Workers in Each Socio-Religious Categories by Enterprise-Type for Male and Female Workers, 2004-05, (All workers aged 15-64 years)




Distribution of Workers in Each Socio- Religious Category by Location of Work, 2004-05, (All workers aged 15-64)




Distribution of Male and Female Workers in Each Socio- Religious Category by Location of Work, 2004-05, (All workers aged 15-64)




Distribution of Male and Female Workers in Each Socio-Religious Category by Industry Groups, 2004-05, (All workers aged 15-64)





Distribution of Workers in Each Socio- Religious Category by Industry Groups in Rural and Urban Areas, 2004-05, (All workers aged 15-64)




Distribution of Workers in Each Socio-Religious Category by Occupation Groups, 2004-05, (All workers aged 15-64)




Conditions of Work of Regular Salaried /Wage (15-64 years) by Socio-Religious Categories, 2004-05




Changes in Industrial and Occupational Profile of Workers of Different Socio-Religious Categories over time





Priority Sector Advances extended to SRCs by Type of Bank in India and 44 Selected Minority Concentration Districts (Average of 5 years ending 31 March 2001 to 31 March 2005)




Share of SRCs in No. of Accounts & Amount Outstanding by Type of Bank (Average for years ending March 2001 - 2005)




Priority Sector Advances of ASCBs for the SRCs by States (Annual Average for 5 years' ending 31st March 2001 to 31st March 2005)




Sector Advances per Account-ASCBs- Average for 5 years ending 31st March 2001-05




Share of SRCs in No. of Accounts & Amount Outstanding of Minority Concentration Districts by Type of Bank (Average for years ending March 2001 - 2005)




Priority Sector Advances of ASCBs for the SRCs by States (Annual Average for 5 years' ending 31st March 2001 to 31st March 2005)




Advance per Account by SCBs in Selected Districts (Average for years ending March 2001-2005)




Percentage Share of Muslims in SCBs PSAs by Economic Sectors (Average for 3 years ending Mar2003-2005)




Percentage Share of Muslims in PSA by Economic Sectors in SCBs in Selected States (Average for 3 years ending Mar 2003-05)




Share of Muslims in Deposit of SCBs (Average for 3 years ending 31st March 2003-2005)




Share of Muslims in Deposit (average for years ending March 2003-2005)




Percentage share of Muslims in Credit Extended by SIDBI - April 2000-March 2006




Amount Sanctioned & Disbursed per Account by SIDBI: April 2000-March 2006




Sanctions to Muslims by SIDBI - Apr 2000- Mar 2006




Villages with more than 50% Muslim Population Availing Banking Service – 2001




Dimensions of Access to Physical and Social Infrastructure




Amenities within villages, India, by Share of Muslim Population in Village of various Sizes





Having Educational Institutions Within Villages, 2001




Number of Villages without Basic Facilities, All India 2001




Households with Pucca Structures and not having any Toilet Facility by SRCs and Residence




Share of SRCs by Levels of Village Electrification




Not using Electricity for Lighting




% HHs having Tap Water




Households using Electricity/LPG/Biogas as Main Source of Fuel by SRCs and Residence




Households not using LPG / Electricity / Biogas and Kerosene for Cooking Purposes, 2001




Head Count Ratio (HCR) and Growth of GDP




MPCE by Place of Residence and SRCs, 2004-05




MPCE According to Urban Size Class and SRCs, 1993-94




Distribution of Population of Each SRC by Expenditure Classes, 2004-05 – Urban




Distribution of Population of Each SRC by Expenditure Classes, 2004-05 – Rural




Urban-MPCEs according to SRCs for selected States - 2004-05




Gini Coefficients across SRCs




Land Holding




HCRs by Place of Residence and SRCs: 2004-05




MPCE of Poor and Its Ratio to Poverty Line by SRCs, 2004 – 05




State-wise Urban Poverty Incidence across SRCs in 2004-05




Statewise Rural Poverty Incidence across SRCs in 2004-05




HCRs Over Time 1987 to 2005 According to Place of Residence and SRCs




Change in HCRs over time according to SRC and place of residence




Share of Public Sector




Muslim Employees in Government Sector Employment




Share of Muslims in All India Civil Services – 2006




Recommended Candidates though the Union Public Service Commission (2003 and 2004)




Share of Muslim Employees in Selected Central Government Department and Institutions




Employment in Universities among SRCs No. of Employees: 1,37,263




Employment in National Banks No. of Employees: 275841




Employment in Central PSUs No. of Employees: 687512




Share of Muslim Employees in Selected State Governments (No. of Employees : 44,52,851*)




Share of Muslim Employees in Selected State Government Departments (No. of Employees : 44,52,851)




Share of Muslims in Judiciary Employment No. of Employees: 98593




Share of Muslims Recruited through State Public Service Commissions during the last 5 years. (Recommended/selected for recruitment*: 63,402)




Share of Muslims Interviewed in State Public Service Commissions* (Candidates called for Interview: 40,085)




Percentage Share of Deliveries in Home and Institutions




Percentage Coverage of the ICDS for 0-6 years old Population by States and SRCs 2004-05




Percentage Coverage of the Mid Day Meal for 6-16 years old Population by States and SRCs 2004-05




Disbursals under Term Loan Scheme by NMDFC: 2002-3 to 2005-6




Beneficiaries under Term Loan Scheme by NMDFC: 2002-3 to 2005-6




Relative Reservation shares/Quotas for Public Employment : All India and Major States






Distribution of Population by SRCs




Distribution of Population According to SRCs by States




Literacy Levels of SRCs by Place of Residence




% of Children aged 6-12 years not attending school




Distribution of Persons (aged 6 + years) in Each SRC by Levels of Education




Proportion of Persons aged 20 years+ with Higher Education in Each SRC




Worker-Population Ratio: 2004-5




Proportion of workers in Formal sector: 2004-5




Average Daily Wages and Salary for Casual and Regular Workers (Rupees)




Distribution of Male Workers by Place of Work for Each SRCs




Distribution of Female Workers by Place of Work for Each SRCs




Representation in Public Employment




Distribution of Employees in Universities




Incidence of Poverty Among SRCs – 2004-05




Average Monthly per Capita Expenditure by Place of Residence and SRCs




Inequality Measured Using Gini Coefficient




Average Per Household Land Owned - 2004-05




Educational, Employment and Economic Status of Muslim – OBCs,Muslim – Gen and Hindu – OBCs – A Comparative Picture






Properties Gazetted as Wakfs in Indian States




Returns to Investment in Wakf Properties in India




Some instances of unauthorized occupation of gazetted Wakfs by Governments and their agencies reported to the Committee by various state Wakf Boards during 2005-06




Prime Minister Indira Gandhi's letter addressed to the Chief Ministers




Mandate of the Joint Parliamentary Committee on Wakfs - 1996-2006




Years of Schooling assigned to each age category




Distribution of Population Completing at Least Primary Education by Religion




Age Groups,Mid Points and corresponding years




Distribution of Population according to SRCs by States (All India)





Distribution of Population according to SRCs by States (Urban)





Distribution of Population according to SRCs by States (Rural)





Summary of Representations by States




State Assembly Electoral Constituency / Tahsil, Reserved for Scheduled Castes with relative share of Muslim Population






Population Trends for Major Religions of India, 1961-2001




Population Trends among All Population and Muslim Population - India and Large States, 1961-2001 (Population in thousands)





Trends in Share of Muslim Population, India and Large States, 1961-2001




Population Growth, All Population and Muslim Population, India and Large States, 1961-2001 (Percent increase)




Top Fifty Districts by Muslim Population Size and Percentage, 2001 Census





Socio-Economic Indicators of Top 100 Districts (by size of Muslim Population), 2001 Census








Age Distribution, All Population and Muslim Population, India and Large States, 2001 (Percent of population)




Trends in Sex Ratio, All Population and Muslim Population, India and Large States, 1961-2001 (females per 1000 males)




Trends in Urbanisation, All Population and Muslim Population, India and Large, 1961-2001




Religious Differentials in Child Mortality in India




Religious Differentials in Child Mortality, India and Selected States, NFHS-2, 1998-99




Religious Differentials in Fertility, India and Large States, NFHS-2, 1998-99




Contraceptive Prevalence Rate by Religion, India and Large States, NFHS-2, 1998-99 (Percent of Couples of Reproductive Ages Practising Contraception)




Projected Non- Muslim and Muslim Populations under various Alternatives, India, 2011-2101




State-wise Literacy Levels - 2001




State-wise Literacy Levels by Gender (Urban) - 2001




State-wise Literacy Levels by Gender (Rural) - 2001




Mean Years of Schooling of children aged 7-16 years - 2001








Proportion of children aged 6-14 years enrolled by SRCs - 2004-2005




Number of Madrasa students




Investment required for establishing Schools in all Muslim Dominated Villages currently without schools




Percentage who completed atleast Primary School, 2001 (selected states)







Percentage who completed atleast Middle School, 2001 (selected states)







Percentage who completed atleast Matric , 2001 (selected states)






Percentage who Completed atleast Graduate School, 2001 (All India-Graduation)





Percentage who Completed atleast Graduate School, 2001 (Bengal-Graduate)





Percentage who Completed atleast Graduate School, 2001 (Kerala-Graduate)





Percentage who Completed atleast Graduate School, 2001 (Uttar Pradesh-Graduate)





Percentage who Completed atleast Graduate School, 2001 (Bihar-Graduate)





Percentage who Completed atleast Graduate School, 2001 (Karnataka-Graduate)





Percentage who Completed atleast Graduate School, 2001 (Maharashtra-Graduate)





Percentage who Completed atleast Graduate School, 2001 (Andhra Pradesh-Graduate)





Percentage who Completed atleast Graduate School, 2001 (Gujarat-Graduate)





Literacy Rate by Social Groups, 2001 (All India-Literacy)





Literacy Rate by Social Groups, 2001 (West Bengal-Literacy)





Literacy Rate by Social Groups, 2001 (Kerala-Literacy)





Literacy Rate by Social Groups, 2001 (Uttar Pradesh-Literacy)





Literacy Rate by Social Groups, 2001 (Bihar-Literacy)





Literacy Rate by Social Groups, 2001 (Karnataka-Literacy)





Literacy Rate by Social Groups, 2001 (Maharashtra-Literacy)





Literacy Rate by Social Groups, 2001 (Andhra Pradesh-Literacy)





Literacy Rate by Social Groups, 2001 (Gujarat-Literacy)





Age Specific Worker Population Ratios by SRCs, 2004-05




Percentage of Regular Salaried/Wage Non-Agricultural Workers in each SRC Employed in Government/Public & Large Private Sectors: 2004-05




Distribution of All (Principal & Subsidiary) Workers (age 15-64) by Two Digit Industrial Groups for Each SRCs: 2004-05













Percentage Distribution of All (Principal & Subsidiary) Workers by Two Digit Occupational Groups for Each SRCs, 2004-05
















Worker Population Rates in Each State by SRCs, All Workers, 2004-05




Percentage of Workers Employed in Manufacturing Sector in Each State by SRCs, 2004-05




Percentage of Workers Engaged in Trade in Each State by SRCs, 2004-05 (All Workers)




Percentage Self Employed Workers in Each State by SRCs in Urban Areas (All Workers)




List of Scheduled Commercial Banks




Priority Sector Advances Granted to the Members of Specified Minority Communities Vis-à-vis Overall Priority Sector Advances in India : 2001-2005 (No. of A/Cs - In Thousands, Amount - In Rupees Crores)




Priority Sector Advances Granted to the Members of Specified Minority Communities Vis-à-vis Overall Priority Sector Advances in Minority Concentrated Districts: 2005





Percentage Share of Muslims in Priority Sector Advances for Scheduled Commercial Banks by Economic Classification and State (Annual Average for 3 years ending 31st March 2002-2005)




Share of Muslims in Individual Deposit in Scheduled Commercial Banks by State (Annual Average for 3 years ending 31st March 2002 - March 2005)




Individual Deposit per Account in Scheduled Commercial Banks by State (Annual Average for 3 years ending 31st March 2002-2005, in Rupees)




Benefits Accruing to Muslim under Programmes Implemented by SIDBI : 2000-01 to 2005-06




NABARD Refinance of Production Credit and Investment Credit and Share of Muslims (Annual Average for Two Years -2004-05 and 2005-06)




Having Medical Facilities Within Villages, 2001 Census




Having Post and Telegraph Facilities Within Villages, 2001 Census




Having Bus Stop Within Villages, 2001 Census




Having Proper Pucca Approach Road to Villages, 2001 Census




Number of Villages without Basic Facilities




Percentage of Villages Having Educational Institutions Within Village, 2001 Census




Percentage of Villages Having Medical Facilities Within Village, 2001 Census




Percentage of Villages Having Post and Telegraph Facilities Within Village, 2001 Census




Percentage of Villages Having Bus Stop Within Village, 2001 Census




Percentage of Villages Having Pucca Approach Road to Village, 2001 Census




Percentage of Villages Having Pucca Approach Road to Village, 2001 Census




Poverty Lines




State level Urban MPCE according to SRCs 2004-05 (current prices)




State level Rural MPCE according to SRCs 2004-05 (current prices)




Inequality in MPCE across States




Poverty Incidence compared over time 1983 to 2004-05 - Urban




Poverty Incidence compared over time 1983 to 2004-05, Rural




Share of Employment in Indian Railways according to SRCs (Total No. of Employees: 14,18,747)




Share of Employment in National Security Agencies* (No. of Employees: 5,19,008)




Share of Employment in Post and Telegraphs (No. of Employees: 275841)




Employment Data provided by State Governments




Share of Muslims Employees in States - Education Departments (No. of Employees : 15,46,861)




Share of Muslims Employees in States - Home Departments (No. of Employees : 6,37,146)




Share of Muslims Employees in States - Health Departments (No. of Employees : 4,01,956)




Share of Muslim Employees in States - Transport Departments (Total No. of Employees : 2,10,989)




Share of Muslim Employees in All Other Departments in Selected States (No. of Employees : 15,95,349)



Share of Muslim Employees in Judiciary (No. of Employees: 98593)




Share of Muslim Employees in State PSUs (No. of Employees : 7,63,439)




Flow of Benefits to Muslims under Selected Beneficiary Oriented Programmes: Average Annual during 2002-03 to 2005-06






Share of Muslims in Amount Disbursed by NMDFC and Beneficiaries Covered Under Term Loan Scheme : April 2002 - March 2006




Expenditure Incurred and Persons Benefited under Programmes Implemented by Backward Classes & Minorities Department/Corporation for the Welfare of Minorities/Muslims in State Plans: Average Annual during 2002-03 to 2004-05




State-wise Population of ST Muslims in India (Census 1991)




Representation in Public Sector Employment




Distribution of SRCs by Income (Expenditure) Groups




Source: Sachar report



Data related to Indian Muslim from Arjun Sengupta Commission Report


Percentage Distribution of Expenditure Classes by Social Identity, Informal Work Status and Education, 2004-2005




Percentage Distribution of Rural Unorganised Non-agricultural Workers by Land Size Class and Socio-Religious Groups 2004 - 2005




Mean Years of Schooling in Non-agriculture by Sector, Sex among Socio-Religious Groups 2004 - 2005




Educational Distribution of Non-agriculture Workers by Sector and Gender among Socio-Religious Groups (Percentage) 2004 -2005




Proportion of Non-agriculture Workers by Employment Status, Sector and Gender among Socio-Religious Groups (Percentage) 2004-2005: All India




Distribution of Non-agricultural Workers by Employment Status, Sector & Sex among Socio-Religious Groups (Percentage) 2004 - 2005




Poverty Ratios among Unorganised Sector Workers by Social Groups2004-2005




Incidence of Out-of-School Children (Labour Pool) and Child Labour (5 - 14 Years) across Socio-religious Groups 2004 - 2005




Poverty Ratio among Rural Agricultural Labourers by Socio-Religious Groups 2004 - 2005




Poverty Ratios among Farmers by Socio-Religious Groups and Land (Possessed) Size Classes, Rural 2004 - 2005




Percentage of Rural Agricultural Labourers by Socio-Religious Groups 2004-2005




Distribution of Rural Non-agricultural Workers by Land Size Class and Socio-Religious Groups 2004 - 2005





Mean Years of Schooling of Non-agricultural Workers by Sector, Sex and Sector of Occupation among Social Groups 2004 - 2005: Total




Mean Years of Schooling of Non-agricultural Workers by Sector, Sex and Sector of Occupation among Social Groups 2004 - 2005: Rural




Mean Years of Schooling of Non-agricultural Workers by Sector, Sex and Sector of Occupation among Social Groups 2004 - 2005: Urban




Percentage of Non-agricultural Workers by Employment Status, Sector and Gender among Socio-Religious Groups 2004-2005





Poverty Ratios among Unorganised Non-agriculture Workers by Social Groups




Percentage of Rural Agricultural Labour Households by Social Groups




Source: Arjun Sengupta Commission Report



Education in India, 2007-08: Participation and Expenditure

Per 1000 distribution of age 5-29 by current attendance and current enrolment status [rural male+ rural female]




Per 1000 of ever-enrolled age 5-29 by current attendance for each completed level of education [male]




Per 1000 of ever-enrolled age 5-29 by for each completed level of education [rural] - part II




Per 1000 distribution of age 5-29 by current attendance and current enrolment status [urban all]




Ever enrolled and completed [rural+urban]




% distribution of age 5-29 years by current enrolment and attendance status in educational institutions.




Per 1000 of ever-enrolled age 5-29 by current attendance for each completed level of education [rural] -part II




Per 1000 distribution of households by distance of school. [rural+urban]




Per 1000 distribution of age 5-29 by current attendance and current enrolment status [urban male+ urban female]




Ever enrolled and completed [rural]




Per 1000 distribution of households by distance of school. [rural]




ever enrolled and completed [rural] - part II




ever enrolled and completed [urban]




Per 1000 of ever-enrolled age 5-29 by for each completed level of education [female]




Per 1000 distribution of age 5-29 by level of current attendance [rural male+ rural female]




ever enrolled and completed [female] -part I




Per 1000 distribution of households by distance of school. [urban]




Per 1000 of ever-enrolled age 5-29 by current attendance for each completed level of education [female]




Per 1000 of ever-enrolled age 5-29 by for each completed level of education [rural+urban]




ever enrolled and completed [male] -part I




Per 1000 distribution of age 5-29 by current attendance and current enrolment status [rural +urban]




Per 1000 of ever-enrolled age 5-29 by current attendance for each completed level of education [all India]




Per 1000 of ever-enrolled age 5-29 by for each completed level of education [urban]




Per 1000 of ever-enrolled age 5-29 by current attendance for each completed level of education [rural]




Per 1000 of ever-enrolled age 5-29 by current attendance for each completed level of education [urban]




Per 1000 distribution of age 5-29 by level of current attendance [rural +urban]




Per 1000 of ever-enrolled age 5-29 by for each completed level of education [rural]




ever enrolled and completed [female] -part II




ever enrolled and completed [urban] -part II




ever enrolled and completed [male] -part II




Per 1000 distribution of age 5-29 by level of current attendance [urban]




Per 1000 distribution of age 5-29 by current attendance and current enrolment status [rural all]




Per 1000 of ever-enrolled age 5-29 by for each completed level of education [male]




Communal Violence

Data from Ministry of Home Affairs, Government of India

Year Number of incident Killed Injured
2013(till Oct) 725 143 1978
2012 668 94 2117
2011 580 91 1899
2010 701 116 2138
2009 719 117 2298
2008 656 123 2272
2007 681 96 2117
2006 698 133 2170
2005 779 124 2066
2004 640 129 2022
1970 (till Sept) 413 274 1475
1969 519 603 .
1968 346 . .
1967 220 . .
1966 133 . .
1965 676 . .
1964 . 2057 .
1961 92 . .

source for data from 1961-1970: http://www.columbia.edu/itc/mealac/pritchett/00litlinks/naim/ambiguities...

Per Capita Income

Per Capita Income

1.The per capita income at current prices is estimated at Rs. 46,492 in 2009-10 as against Rs. 40,605 for the previous year depicting a growth of 14.5 per cent.

2. The new per capita income figure estimates on current market prices is over Rs. 2,000 more than the previous estimate of Rs. 44,345 calculated by the Central Statistical Organisation (CSO).

3. The increase in per capita income was only about 6 per cent in 2009-10 if it is calculated on the prices of 2004-05 prices, which is a better way of comparison and broadly factors inflation.

Source:http://profit.ndtv.com/news/show/india-s-per-capita-income-rises-to-rs-4...

http://mospi.nic.in/Mospi_New/upload/nad_press_release_31jan11.pdf

Pollution

 

Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB)
has identified 24 problem areas on the basis of status of air and water pollution
by industries for preparation of Environment Management Plans (EMP). [May 2008]

List
of 24 Problem Areas

S.NO

Problem
Area

State

1

Angul - Talcher

Orissa

2

Ankleshwar

Gujarat

3

Bhadravati

Karnataka

4

BollaramPatancheru

Andhra
Pradesh

5

Chembur

Maharashtra

6

Dhanbad

Bihar

7

Digboi

Assam

8

Durgapur

West
Bengal

9

Greater
Cochin

Kerala

10

Howrah

West
Bengal

11

Jodhpur

Rajasthan

12

Kala Amb

Himachal Pradesh

13

Korba

Chattisgarh

14

Manali

Tamil
Nadu

15

Mandi, Gobindgarh

Punjab

16

Nagda-Ratlam

Madhya
Pradesh

17

Najafgarh Drain Basin Area

Delhi

18

Vellore (North Arcot)

Tamil
Nadu

19

Pali

Rajasthan

20

Parwanoo

Himachal Pradesh

21

Singrauli

Uttar
Pradesh

22

Tarapur

Maharashtra

23

Vapi

Gujarat

24

Vishakhapatnam

Andhra
Pradesh


Poor in India

55% of India's population poor(Multi-dimensional Poverty Index- Developed by the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative (OPHI) for the United Nations Development Programmes (UNDP))

1. About 645 million people or 55% of India's population is poor as measured by this composite indicator made up of ten markers of education, health and standard of living achievement levels.

2. The new data also shows that even in states generally perceived as prosperous such as Haryana, Gujarat and Karnataka, more than 40% of the population is poor by the new composite measure, while Kerala is the only state in which the poor constitute less than 20%.

3. A person is defined as poor if he or she is deprived on at least 3 of the 10 indicators. By this definition, 55% of India was poor, close to double India's much-criticised official poverty figure of 29%. Almost 20% of Indians are deprived on 6 of the 10 indicators.

4. Half of all children in India are under-nourished according to the National Family Health Survey III (2005-06). Close to 40% of those who are defined as poor are also nutritionally deprived.

5. A comparison of the state of Madhya Pradesh and the sub-Saharan nation of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), which have close to the same population and a similar MPI (0.389 and 0.393 respectively), shows that nutritional deprivation, arguably the most fundamental part of poverty, in MP far exceeds that in the DRC.Nutritional deprivation contributes to almost 20% of MP's MPI and only 5% of the DRC's MPI.

6. Multi-dimensional poverty is highest (81.4% poor) among Scheduled Tribes within India's Hindu population, followed by Scheduled Castes (65.8%), Other Backward Class (58.3%) and finally the general population (33.3%).

7. Based on the MPI, Bihar has by far the most poor of any state in the country, with 81.4% of its population defined as poor, which is close to 12% more than the next worst state of Uttar Pradesh.

8. As per the Planning Commission's figures, 41.4% of Bihar and 32.8% of UP is poor. In a possible indication of inadequate access to health and education facilities which do not show up in income poverty, almost 60% of north-east India and close to 50% of Jammu & Kashmir are poor as per the MPI, while the Planning Commission figures are around 16% and 5% respectively.

Report: http://www.ophi.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/Country-Brief-India.pdf

Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/55-of-Indias-population-poor-Re...


Source: IBNLive


Source: Hindustan Times


‘Every third Indian lives in poverty’(Suresh Tendulkar Report 2009)

1. Every third Indian is living in poverty, according to the estimate of a government-appointed committee which said the number of poor has shot up by more than 10 per cent to over 37 per cent.

2. Among the states, Orissa and Bihar are the worst while Nagaland, Delhi and J&K have the least number of poor. However, according to the World Bank’s estimates, 41.6 per cent Indians live on less than US$ 1.25 a day, the international poverty line.

3. The World Bank in its report ‘Global Economic Prospects for 2009’ had projected that even by 2015, one-fourth of India’s population will be living in extreme poverty.

4. n Orissa 57.2 per cent of population live under poverty. The poor in rural Orissa spend just Rs 407.78 per month and in urban areas their spending is Rs 497.31.

5. In Bihar 54.4 per cent of the population is poor. In Madhya Pradesh over 48.6 per cent of people live below poverty line with a rural person in the state having only Rs 408 to spend on their various necessities in a month.

source: http://www.deccanherald.com/content/40703/every-third-indian-lives-pover...


Poverty in India(National Commission for Enterprises in the Unorganised Sector (NCEUS) Report 2007:

1. Nearly 836 million people, or 77 per cent of the population, lived on less than Rs.20 a day.

2. The “extremely poor” are those with a per capita expenditure of Rs.8.9 a day while the “poor” are those who can spend up to Rs.11.6 a day. The “marginally poor” spend Rs.14.6 a day and the “vulnerable” spend Rs.20.3. In 2004-05.

3. The extremely poor constituted 6.4 per cent of the population while the poor constituted 15.4 per cent. The marginally poor constituted 19 per cent of the population, and along with the vulnerable, this group constituted 77 per cent of the population.

4 The poor and the vulnerable comprise nearly 79 per cent of the informal workers, 88 per cent of the Scheduled Castes and the Scheduled Tribes, 80 per cent of the OBCs and 84 per cent of Muslims.

5. There was a slight reduction in extreme poverty between 1993 and 2005, but the percentage of the “vulnerable” population increased from 32 to 36 per cent. On the other hand, the high-income group increased from 18 to 23 per cent of the population.

Source: http://www.hinduonnet.com/thehindu/thscrip/print.pl?file=200710055024032...


1. 28.5 per cent of India’s population live below the poverty line.

Source: http://www.hindustantimes.com/Poverty-line-set-to-rise-number-of-poor-to...

Refugees and asylum seekers in India

Refugees and Asylum Seekers in India

1. India has traditionally treated refugees well even though it is not a party to the 1951 Refugee Convention and its 1967 Protocol

2. Today, about 110,000 Tibetans live in India according to the Ministry of Home Affairs' annual report, which cites the Dalai Lama.

3. The approximately 80,000 Tibetans who arrived in the first and largest wave received resident permits and were offered low-paying public works jobs by the Indian government. However, more recent Tibetan refugees have not been as welcome, with many denied residence permits.

4. In 2007, 9,200 Afghanistan refugees (92 percent of them Hindu or Sikh) were living in India, according to a spokesperson for UNHCR. More recently, the Indian government has agreed to naturalize many of these Hindu and Sikh Afghans who have lived in India since 1979.

5. As of late 2008, about 73,000 Sri Lankan refugees were living in 117 camps across southern India, mainly in Tamil Nadu.

6. As of 2005, UNHCR reported that India had 139,283 refugees and 303 asylum seekers. Of this population, UNHCR protects and assists some 11,000 urban refugees. More recently, India has received Iraqi and Palestinian refugees from Baghdad, some of whom have been resettled to third countries.

Source: http://www.migrationinformation.org/Profiles/display.cfm?ID=745#16

Safety tips for online shopping

Telephone subscribers

Circle/ State-wise landline, wirelesstelephones and tele-density

Sr. No.

Name of Circle/ State

Landline telephones         

Wireless telephones         

Total telephones

Over all tele-density (in %)

1

Andaman & Nicobar*

19,663

73,111

92,774

20.08

2

Andhra Pradesh

2,548,635

27,510,674

30,059,309

36.20

3

Assam

358,915

5,224,949

5,583,864

18.77

4

Bihar

971,244

16,885,376

17,856,620

18.84

5

Chhattisgarh*

292,662

861,733

1,154,395

4.90

6

Gujarat

2,127,825

21,673,079

23,800,904

41.13

7

Haryana

868,311

8,515,350

9,383,661

38.26

8

Himachal Pradesh

383,871

3,003,717

3,387,588

50.93

9

Jammu & Kashmir

243,920

2,966,868

3,210,788

28.19

10

Jharkhand*

416,168

756,636

1,172,804

3.84

11

Karnataka

2,779,015

21,142,491

23,921,506

41.19

12

Kerala

3,593,756

15,033,093

18,626,849

54.63

13

Madhya Pradesh

1,401,239

17,440,843

18,842,082

27.03

14

Maharashtra (-)   Mumbai

3,238,586

27,483,273

30,721,859

33.75

15

North East-I

206,933

2,539,355

2,746,288

38.90

16

North East-II*

125,743

345,087

470,830

8.13

17

Orissa

688,341

7,521,397

8,209,738

20.54

18

Punjab

1,649,018

13,329,536

14,978,554

52.97

19

Rajasthan

1,668,778

19,845,576

21,514,354

32.86

20

Tamil Nadu (-) Chennai

2,299,074

24,499,550

26,798,624

45.07

21

Uttarakhand*

302,339

745,131

1,047,470

10.87

22

Uttar Pradesh

2,491,632

39,785,087

42,276,719

21.88

23

West Bengal (-)  Kolkata

1,054,175

13,554,880

14,609,055

19.84

24

Kolkata

1,520,609

10,388,544

11,909,153

81.26

25

Chennai

1,386,735

8,713,872

10,100,607

121.83

26

Delhi

2,475,073

19,972,366

22,447,439

129.33

27

Mumbai

2,785,895

17,082,234

19,868,129

99.87

 

Total

37,898,155

346,893,808

384,791,963

33.23

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:   

 

 

 

 

(1) * Figs for Landline telephone connections of Bharti Airtel Limited is shown in Chhatishgarh & Madhya Pradesh seperately. Figures for Cellular & WLL telephone connections of Bharti Airtel  for Chhatishgarh are included in Madhya Pradesh.

(2)  * Figs. for Land line,WLL and Cellular Connections provided by Private Operators in Andaman & Nicobar, Jharkhand, Uttaranchal, Chhattishgarh and NE-II are included in West Bengal, Bihar, Uttar Pradesh, Madhaya Pradesh and NE-I respectively, as private operators are providing data service area wise only.

(3)   Source  BSNL /  MTNL /  COAI / AUSPI.

Tobacco users in India

Tobacco users in India

1. India is the world's second largest consumer of tobacco. An estimated 274.9 million Indians consume tobacco, the first Global Adult Tobacco Survey said.

2. Nearly 0.9 million tobacco-related deaths occur in India annually as compared to 5.5 million world wide.

3. India is also the world's third largest producer of tobacco.

4. Widespread tobacco use among the youth, with more than 15 percent of youngsters under 15 years of age, and nearly 25 percent of those between 15 to 17 years consuming tobacco. The figure for those in the 18 to 19 age bracket was 19 percent.

5. The mean age of starting tobacco use was found to be 17.8 years. Surprisingly, while the mean age for boys was 18 years, for girls it was 17 years.

6. Two out of every five (40 percent) tobacco users in the bracket of 20 to 34 years started using tobacco on a daily basis before the age of 18.

7. Nearly 26.1 percent non-smokers were exposed to second-hand smoke at work. At home, the figure was 52.2 percent.

8. The north eastern states have the highest number of tobacco users, with 19.3 percent people using tobacco in one form or the other. Mizoram tops the list with nearly 40 percent users, while Goa is at the bottom with 4.8 percent.

Report: http://www.who.int/tobacco/surveillance/gats/en/index.html

Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/India-worlds-second-largest-tob...

Travel

Domestic Travel

1. Indians did not travel for leisure or fun as most of them toured to meet social or religious obligations. Visits for the social purpose accounted for 75% of overnight trips in rural India, and 71% in urban areas.

2. Around 9% of overnight trips were due to pilgrimage for rural folks. While, the corresponding figure for the urban population is 12%.

3. Holidaying, leisure and recreation was a privilege for only 5% and 2% of urban and rural populace, respectively, says the survey.

4. Trips on social purpose — for both rural and urban population — accounted for about 43% of all their expenditures. Journey for health and medical grounds had a share of 30% spending for the rural population, and 15% for the urban. Religious and pilgrimage trips cost about 11% in the rural sector and about 14% in the urban.

5. Urban India spent Rs 989 and rural population Rs 466 per trip during 2008-09. On an average, an urban Indian spent Rs 700 per day on a religious visit as compared to Rs 350 in rural areas. The maximum expenditure was on travel followed by shopping, eating and accommodation.

6. 72% of Indians travel to meet friends and family at least once a year. And, the average period of these visits is three to four days. Interestingly, in case of 85% of rural and 80% of urban travellers, the visitors stayed with friends and relatives for the major part of their stay.

7. Only 42% of the population travel once every year overnight for various reasons, with Jammu and Kashmir and Himachal Pradesh being exceptions. In J&K, overnight travellers were 84% of the population, and in Himachal they were 77%. The states, where average overnight travel was higher than the national average, were Kerala, Madhya Pradesh, Punjab, Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh.

8. Overnight travel among residents of most north-eastern states was found to be the lowest among all Indians. The share of transport in expenditure was 20% in rural areas, but as much as 33% in urban India. The share of shopping was 30% in rural India, and 25% in urban India.

Source: http://mospi.nic.in/Mospi_New/upload/press_note_536_20oct10.pdf

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/Only-5-of-Indians-in-cities-hol...


 Foreign
Tourist Arrivals (FTAS) and Foreign Exchange Earnings (FEE) from
tourism in India during 2008 and comparative figures of 2006 and 2007

 
 

Foreign Tourist Arrivals

 

 

 

 

Month

     Foreign Tourist Arrivals (Nos.)  

Percentage Change

2006

2007 @

2008 @

2007/2006

2008/2007

January

459489

532088

584765

15.8%

9.9%

February

439090

498806

560658

13.6%

12.4%

March

391009

444186

509926

13.6%

14.8%

April

309208

333945

369677

8.0%

10.7%

May

255008

267758

290785

5.0%

8.6%

Total

1853804

2076783

2315811

12.0%

11.5%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Foreign Exchange Earnings in Rs.
Crore

 

 

 

Month

Foreign Exchange Earnings (in Rs. Crore)

Percentage Change

2006

2007**

2008#

2007/2006

2008/2007

January

3970

4777

5642

20.3%

18.1%

February

3793

4478

5431

18.1%

21.3%

March

3378

3988

4968

18.1%

24.6%

April

2850

3154

3271

10.7%

3.7%

May

2350

2528

2651

7.6%

4.9%

Total

16341

18925

21963

15.8%

16.1%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Foreign Exchange Earnings in US$ million

 

 

 

Month

Foreign Exchange Earnings (in US$ million)

Percentage Change

2006

2007**

2008#

2007/2006

2008/2007

January

894

1081

1433

20.9%

32.6%

February

854

1014

1368

18.7%

34.9%

March

761

903

1231

18.7%

36.3%

April

627

765

817

22.0%

6.8%

May

517

613

630

18.6%

2.8%

Total

3653

4376

5479

19.8%

25.2%

 

 

 

 

 

 

@ Provisional Estimates    ** Partially Revised
Estimates  #  Advance Estimates

 

 

Note:

Figures for January - June 2007 have been revised based on the
Partially Revised figures now available from the Reserve Bank of
India

 

 

Domestic passengers carried by Indian scheduled airlines April 2008

The total domestic passengers carried by the Scheduled Airlines of India during the month of April, 2008 was 38.92 lakhs. The break-up is as follows:

Air India (Domestic) – 5.86 lakhs,

Jet Airways – 8.39 lakhs,

Jet Lite – 3.11 lakhs,

Deccan – 5.30 lakhs,

Kingfisher – 5.58 lakhs,

Spice Jet – 3.94 lakhs,

Paramount – 0.48 lakhs,

Go Air – 1.80 lakhs,

IndiGo – 4.46 lakhs.

The domestic passengers carried by the Scheduled Airlines of India in April, 2007 was 35.82 lakhs of which Air India (Domestic) carried 7.81 lakhs whereas the private airlines carried 28.01 lakhs.
The percentage share of the carriers in the month of April, 2008 was:

Air India (Domestic) – 15.1%,

Jet Airways – 21.6%,

Jet Lite – 8.0%,

Deccan – 13.6%,

Kingfisher – 14.3%,

Spice Jet – 10.1%,

Paramount – 1.2%,

Go Air – 4.6 % and

IndiGo – 11.5%.

Tribals in India

Poverty among the Scheduled Tribes(UN State of the World's Indigenous Peoples Report (2010)

1. Indigenous people across the world suffer is proportionately high levels of poverty, illiteracy, poor health and human rights abuse.

2. The poverty levels of India’s tribals have remained persistent over time and are lower than those of Scheduled Castes, on a par with those of sub-Saharan countries.

3. It was also found that while poverty among the general population had declined between 1993-1994 and 1999-2000, there
had been little change in poverty levels among indigenous peoples.The poverty gap between Scheduled Castes and other groups in India has decreased while that between the Scheduled Tribes and other groups has widened.

4.Scheduled Tribes also score lower in education, health and other social and economic aspects measured by the
HDI.

5. Whilst India is considered a middle-ranked country in the UNDP HPI ranking of countries, the indigenous communities as a group are comparable to Sub-Saharan countries, which are ranked in the bottom 25. By taking into account the poverty of indigenous peoples,the MDG goal of halving poverty by 2015 may not be achieved in India.

6. Indigenous communities in India are typically rural, and poverty among rural communities is higher than that in urban areas. There are few people without land among the Scheduled Tribes, but their lands have low productivity. The more productive lands, especially in low-lying areas, have been taken over by other communities.

7. There is also less job diversification among Scheduled Tribes. Deprived of formal education and with little access
to capital, they fail to find work, either self-employed or within regular jobs, ending up in casual employment or
in agriculture.

8. Indigenous peoples — in both developed and developing countries — make up 5% of the world’s population but 15% of the poor and one-third of the 900 million extremely poor rural people.

Source: http://www.un.org/esa/socdev/unpfii/documents/SOWIP_web.pdf

Water

 

The State-wise total irrigation potential created (IPC)  upto
March 2007

 (
in

thousand hectare)

State

IPC

Andhra Pradesh

6864.64

Arunachal
Pradesh

119.08

Assam

948.38

Bihar

7717.78

Chhatishgarh

2503.61

Goa

62.16

Gujarat

4241.92

Haryana

3829.03

Himachal
Pradesh

186.54

Jammu & Kashmir

1794.64

Jharkhand

1057.86

Karnataka

2807.61

Kerala

3388.60

Madhya Pradesh

2052.52

Maharashtra

6799.75

Manipur

197.24

Meghalaya

61.76

Mizoram

18.08

Nagaland

94.17

Orissa

3626.67

Punjab

6034.75

Rajasthan

5358.25

Sikkim

33.43

Tamil Nadu

3695.54

Tripura

158.68

Uttarakhand

806.19

Uttar Pradesh

32357.78

West Bengal

5823.46

Union
Territories

57.41

 

The average annual water availability in the country is estimated
to be of the order of 1869 Billion Cubic Meter (
BCM)
as per the assessment made by Central Water Commission. The river basin wise average annual water availability
is given below:

S.N.

River Basin

Average Annual Water Availability

Indus

73.31

Ganga-Brahmaputra-Barak

a.
Ganga
sub basin

525.02

b.
Brahmaputra & Barak
sub-basin

585.60

3.

Godavari

110.54

4.

Krishna

78.12

5.

Cauvery

21.36

6.

Pennar

6.32

7.

East Flowing Rivers between Mahanadi and Pennar

22.52

8.

East Flowing Rivers between Pennar and Kanyakumari

16.46

9.

Mahanadi

66.86

10.

Brahmani
and Baitarni

28.48

11.

Subarnrekha

12.37

12.

Sabarmati

3.81

13.

Mahi

11.02

14.

West Flowing Rivers of Kutchh, Saurashtra including Luni

15.10

15.

Narmada

45.64

16.

Tapi

14.88

17.

West Flowing Rivers from Tapi to Tadri

87.41

18.

West Flowing Rivers from Tadri to Kanyakumari

113.53

19.

Area of Inland Drainage in Rajasthan
Desert

Negl.

20.

Minor River Basins Draining into Bangladesh
and
Myanmar

31.00

Total (National)

1869.37

The Ministry also conducts census of minor irrigation
schemes. The State-wise details of the
number of water bodies used for irrigating culturable
command area of 2000 hectares or less is given below, which is based on the 3rd
Minor Irrigation Census.

Sl.

No.

Name of States/UTs

Total no. of Water Bodies for Irrigation

Irrigation Potential (Ha.)

In use

Not in use

Total

In use

Not in use

Total

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

1

Andhra Pradesh

51547

24014

75561

1289000

351572

1640572

2

Arunachal
Pradesh

174

125

299

5894

3062

8956

3

Assam

755

265

1020

24611

5365

29976

4

Bihar

11879

2676

14555

224506

70294

294800

5

Chattisgarh

36125

6592

42717

174251

28883

203134

6

Goa

2779

98

2877

5026

219

5245

7

Gujarat

1990

2160

4150

226649

34060

260709

8

Haryana

526

35

561

2813

143

2956

9

Himachal
Pradesh

669

43

712

4708

255

4963

10

Jammu & Kashmir

693

88

781

55327

7737

63064

11

Jharkhand

37839

4371

42210

130421

9528

139949

13

Kerala

10963

678

11641

99945

8020

107965

14

Madhya pradesh

35129

4702

39831

260579

32319

292898

15

Maharashtra

61413

8218

69631

475702

27190

502892

16

Manipur

2

0

2

210

0

210

17

Meghalaya

194

76

270

1715

1653

3368

18

Mizoram

440

170

610

1045

277

1322

19

Nagaland

136

25

161

1335

188

1523

20

Orissa

25082

5569

30651

510258

53356

563614

21

Punjab

424

25

449

2417

109

2526

22

Rajasthan

1365

1448

2813

105233

62278

167511

23

Sikkim

363

65

428

8873

3743

12616

24

Tamil Nadu

31624

7119

38743

834378

121700

956078

25

Triupura

419

49

468

7548

1028

8576

26

Uttar Pradesh

3233

745

3978

24005

8512

32517

27

Uttaranchal

6331

3359

9690

68077

14495

82572

28

West Bengal

109421

8855

118276

397034

69301

466335

29

A&N
Island

746

306

1052

2250

835

3085

30

Chandigarh

0

0

0

0

0

0

31

D&N Haveli

44

0

44

236

0

236

32

Daman & Diu

0

0

0

0

0

0

33

Delhi

54

0

54

239

0

239

34

Lakshadweep

0

0

0

0

0

0

35

Pondicherry

14753

3

14756

8643

1

8644

Total

470794

85807

556601

5281935

984745

6266680

Source: Report
on 3rd Minor Irrigation Census

Women

National Family Health Survey-III

1. 59% of women in Bihar have been beaten by their husbands and 32% of women find such abuse justified if a woman argues with her spouse, shows disrespect to her in-laws or is suspected of having an extra-marital relationship.

2. The survey found that in Bihar, the perpetration of physical, sexual and emotional violence against women cut across demographic categories.

3. More than half the surveyed adults in the age group of 15-49 (57%) believe it is justified for a husband to beat his wife under specific circumstances.

4. The survey found Himachal Pradesh, with 6%, reporting the least number of women being beaten by their husbands. Delhi, Kerala, J&K ranked among the 'best' five states with the incidence of violence against wives ranging between 13% and 16%.

5. The 'worst' states were Assam, West Bengal, Uttar Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, Madhya Pradesh and Rajasthan, with the incidence ranging between 40% and 46%.

6. If 66% of males in the lowest wealth index scales had perpetrated violence on their wives, those in the highest wealth index were not far behind at 56%. Wife beating in middle class homes stood at 55%.

7. The survey found nuclear families were likely to record more widespread violence, with 63% women saying they were victims of domestic violence.

Source: http://www.hindustantimes.com/Bihar-leads-wife-beaters-pack